Faculty of Arts & Science
2014-2015 Calendar

 

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New College

Faculty


Associate Professors
D.L. Eyoh, MA, Ph D (African Studies/Political Science)
A. Trotz, BA, MPhil, Ph D (Caribbean Studies/Women and Gender Studies)

Assistant Professor
M. Lo, MA, MSc, Ph D (African Studies/Women and Gender Studies)

Senior Lecturers
A. Itwaru, Ph D (Caribbean Studies)
J. Larkin, BA, M Ed, Ph D (Equity Studies/Women and Gender Studies)
D. Knott, MA, MTS (Writing Centre)

Lecturers
L. Freedman, MFA (Writing Centre/English Language Learning)
A. Guerson, Ph D (International Foundation Program)
L. Manicom, B.Soc.Sci. (Hons), MA (New One/Community Engaged Learning)
A. Wasike, BA, MA, M Ed, Ph D (African Studies)

Introduction

New College courses have in common a commitment to be explorative and inventive and to widen students’ experience by critically examining relationships among academic disciplines. These courses take their place within our various Specialist, Major and Minor programs. These programs are open to all students in the University.

Integration of student experience is a major priority in a college with students from all faculties in the University. The Independent Studies courses provide an opportunity for students to design their own programs and to test their research, analytic, synthetic, and creative skills by writing a thesis.  The Community Engaged Learning Program supports course-based service learning and independent community engaged learning opportunities. These allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge with practical experience, while engaging in meaningful work in campus and community organizations.

Contact:

Program Secretary’s Office:
New College, Room 133 (416-978-5404 or nc.programs@utoronto.ca)

New One:
newone.applications@utoronto.ca

Registrar’s Office:
New College, Room 107 (416-978-2460)

New One:  Learning Without Borders

Food, talk, texting, home - these taken-for-granted elements of our daily lives connect us to other places, people, and communities, locally, nationally, and internationally.  Learning Without Borders grapples with these often invisible connections, asking what it means to be a citizen linked in myriad ways to others across the globe.

Inspired by the social advocacy focus of New College's academic programs, Learning Without Borders offers four interrelated and interdisciplinary courses that address, in different ways, this core question:  given the interconnectedness of our lives, how do we imagine and build socially just global citizenship today?  Through the lenses of food, language, digital media and community, art and culture, and learning across disciplinary borders, New One courses explore how we might build a more equitable and just society.

Selecting one of the theme-based courses, students will work in a small seminar of twenty five students.  There will be opportunities to join together with students from the other three courses for plenary lectures, performances, and workshops, to address common issues, engage different disciplinary approaches, and experience a variety of ways of learning.  Each seminar group will meet weekly for two hours; in addition, plenary events, field trips and workshops will be scheduled regularly throughout the year using a three-hour time slot reserved for all New One courses.  Representatives from New College's community partner organizations and its senior students will be invited to share their insights and wisdom in the smaller and larger learning settings.

All New One courses will provide students with opportunities to develop research, writing and oral communication abilities.  Individual and group projects will encourage innovative and creative forms of inquiry, learning, and presentation of knowledge.  In an annual end-of-year plenary event students will be able to share their work.

New One is a full credit course.  An application is required.  All first-year students in the Faculty of Arts and Science on the St. George campus are eligible for admission.  Students participating in other College One programs are excluded from New One.  For more information about the application process and criteria of selection go to http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/programs/NewOne.htm.

The African Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor) offers opportunities to study the people, ideas and knowledge, cultures and institutions of Africa and African diasporas through interdisciplinary lenses.  The courses are drawn from humanities, social sciences and sciences.  The core courses deal with subjects such as African history and systems of thought, development, African innovations, the slave trade, colonialism, African diasporas, African international relations, health, humanitarianism and politics.

The Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Program

(Minor) allows students to choose from a wide range of courses on mind, consciousness, cognitive science, psychology of religion, health psychology, and sociological analyses of physical and mental health to acquire an understanding of the contributions of Buddhism to the modern understanding of consciousness, mental health and illness, and determinants of physical health.

The Caribbean Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor)  offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Caribbean history, society, economy and culture.  In addition to core offerings, students can also directly engage the Caribbean through courses drawn from history, literature, women and gender studies, Spanish and Portuguese.

The Equity Studies Program

(Major) offers an interdisciplinary approach to social justice theories and practices in a variety of local and global contexts.  Areas of emphasis include disability studies, global food equity and social advocacy.  In addition to core courses, students are required to take equity courses from other programs and departments across the university.

The Human Biology Programs

offer a broad education in life sciences with courses offered by departments in both the Faculties of Arts and Science, and Medicine (see Human Biology section of the Calendar.)

The International Foundation Program

is designed for international students who need to meet the University's English language requirement.  Students will acquire the academic and language skills necessary for full admission to undergraduate studies.  Core courses include one first year history credit course (IFP100Y1), three non-credit language courses and one non-credit discipline-specific course.  For program and admission information, please see http://www.ifp.utoronto.ca.

The Paradigms and Archetypes Program

(Minor) provides opportunities for undergraduates in discipline-based programs to access, through a comparative analysis of primary sources, the structure and dynamics of “paradigms”: archetypal narratives, assumptions, myths, fantasies, analytical protocols and methodologies which govern the conduct of disciplines in every field and all cultures.

N.B. This program has been discontinued; students who are enrolled in the program as of September 2011 will be able to complete it.

The Women and Gender Studies Program

(Specialist, Major, Minor) provides an interdisciplinary and culturally inclusive approach to understanding gender (see Women and Gender Studies section of the Calendar.)


New College Programs

African Studies Specialist (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. D. Eyoh, New College, 416-978-8288. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(11 full courses or their equivalent, including at least four 300+ series courses with at least one FCE at the 400-level)

First Year:
1. NEW150Y1

Higher Years:
2. JQR360H1
3. NEW450Y1
3. 2.5 full course equivalents from Group A, to be chosen from at least two different departments/programs
4. Two full course equivalents from Group B
5. Two full course equivalents from Groups A or B
6. A combination of two language full course equivalents as outlined in Group C
Note: Four FCEs of the eleven courses must be 300/400 series (including at least one 400-series FCE) of which at least one FCE must be from Group A and another from Group B

African Studies Major (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. D. Eyoh, New College, 416-978-8288. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(6 full courses or their equivalent, including two FCEs at the 300+level)

First Year:
1.  NEW150Y1

Higher Years:
2. JQR360H1
3. NEW450Y1
4. 1.5 full course equivalents from Group A
5. Two full course equivalents from Group B, or NEW280Y1 and NEW380Y1
Note: At least two full course equivalents from Groups A and/or B must be at the 300/400 level

African Studies Minor (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. D. Eyoh, New College, 416-978-8288. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(4 full courses or their equivalent, including one FCE at the 300+level)

First Year:
1.  NEW150Y1

Higher Years:
2. One full course equivalent from Group A
3. One full course equivalent from Group B, or another one from Group A
4. One full course equivalent from Group B or NEW280Y1, NEW281Y1 or NEW380Y1
Note: At least one full course equivalent must be a 300/400 series course from Groups A and/or B


African Studies Course Groups

Group A (Courses that deal exclusively with Africa. These include but are not limited to the following):
ENG367H1; FCS392H1; HIS295Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS381H1, HIS382H1, HIS383H1,HIS481H1; JNH350H1; JQR360H1; NEW250Y1, NEW322H1, NEW351Y1, NEW352H1, NEW353H1, NEW358H1, NEW359H1, NEW450Y1, NEW451H1, NEW452H1, NEW453Y1; POL301Y1, POL488Y1, POL489H1; SMC209H1; an independent studies course approved by the Program Committee

Group B (Courses that deal with Africa and/or one or more of its diaspora. These include but are not limited to the following):
ANT204H1, ANT345H1, ANT348H1, ANT364H1, ANT374H1, ANT452H1; ARC233H1; CIN332Y1, CIN372Y1; DTS200Y1, DTS401H1, DTS402H1; ECO230Y1, ECO324Y1; ENG270Y1, ENG359H1, ENG366H1, ENG370H1; ENV221H1, ENV333H1; FOR201H1; FRE332H1, FRE334H1, FRE336H1; GGR338H1, GGR419H1; HAJ453H1; HIS106Y1, HIS294Y1, HIS305H1, HIS359H1, HIS360H1, HIS370H1, HIS393H1, HIS408Y1, HIS413H1, HIS446H1, HIS456Y1, HIS476H1, HIS478H1, HIS487H1; HMB202H1, HMB203H1, HMB303H1, HMB323H1, HMB433H1, HMB443H1; HPS375H1, HPS376H1; JPR374H1; NFS490H1; NMC285H1, NMC286H1, NMC343H1, NMC344H1, NMC362Y1, NMC365Y1, NMC374H1, NMC376H1, NMC377Y1, NMC378H1, NMC381H1, NMC393H1; NEW222H1, NEW224Y1, NEW324H1, NEW325H1; PHL336H1, PHL380H1; POL201Y1, POL417Y1, POL447H1, POL479H1, POL482H1; RLG203Y1, RLG204Y1, RLG241Y1, RLG321H1, RLG333H1, RLG351H1, RLG355H1; SOC210H1; UNI355H1; WGS369H1, WGS380H1, WGS440H1, WGS463H1

Group C:
(NEW280Y1, NEW380Y1)/(FSL221Y1, FSL321Y1/ FSL421Y1)/(NML110Y1, NML210Y1)/(PRT100Y1/ PRT110Y1, PRT220Y1); or two courses in a major African language approved by the Program Committee

Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Minor (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Dr. T. Toneatto, Department of Psychiatry, 45 Willcocks St., room M-135, 416-946-0282/416-875-2533 or tony.toneatto@utoronto.ca. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(4 full courses or their equivalent, including one FCE at the 300+level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

1. NEW232Y1 (Buddhist Psychology: Theories and Applications)
2. 1.5 full course equivalents from NEW214H1, NEW214Y1, NEW331H1, NEW332H1, NEW333H1,   NEW334H1, NEW339H1, NEW438H1
5. 1.5 full course equivalents from: ANT100Y1, ANT204H1, ANT348H1, ANT356H1; COG250Y1; EAS346H1, EAS361H1, EAS368Y1, EAS393Y1; FAH260H1, FAH361H1, FAH364H1; HPS100H1, HPS200H1, HPS250H1, HPS324H1, HPS326H1 HPS352H1; NEW214H1, NEW214Y1, NEW232Y1, NEW302Y1, NEW303H1, NEW331H1, NEW332H1, NEW333H1, NEW336H1, NEW339H1, NEW432H1, NEW433H1, NEW438H1; PHL100Y1, PHL200Y1, PHL201H1, PHL217H1, PHL232H1, PHL235H1, PHL237H1, PHL240H1, PHL244H1, PHL275H1, PHL281H1, PHL310H1, PHL311H1, PHL319H1, PHL320H1, PHL326H1, PHL331H1, PHL332H1, PHL335H1, PHL340H1, PHL341H1, PHL342H1, PHL375H1, PHL376H1, PHL404H1, PHL405H1, PHL406H1, PHL407H1, PHL414H1, PHL415H1, PHL478H1; PSY100H1, PSY210H1, PSY220H1, PSY230H1, PSY240H1, PSY260H1, PSY270H1, PSY280H1, PSY311H1, PSY312H1, PSY313H1, PSY321H1, PSY326H1, PSY331H1, PSY333H1, PSY336H1, PSY337H1, PSY341H1, PSY342H1, PSY343H1, PSY370H1, PSY371H1, PSY414H1, PSY425H1, PSY426H1, PSY434H1, PSY435H1, PSY473H1, PSY493H1; RLG206Y1, RLG207Y1, RLG210Y1, RLG211H1, RLG212H1, RLG229H1, RLG231H1, RLG246H1, RLG280Y1, RLG301H1, RLG303H1, RLG304H1, RLG366H1, RLG368H1, RLG372H1, RLG373H1, RLG375H1, RLG377H1, RLG378H1, RLG379H1, RLG380H1, RLG421H1, RLG440H1, RLG462H1, RLG463H1, RLG464H1, RLG466H1, RLG467H1, RLG469Y1, RLG470H1; SOC101Y1, SOC212H1, SOC243H1, SOC248H1, SOC250Y1, SOC363H1, SOC410H1, SOC448H1, SOC483Y1; VIC106H1

Caribbean Studies Specialist (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. M. J. Newton, New College, 416-978-4054. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(10 full courses or their equivalent, including at least four 300+ series courses with at least one FCE at the 400-level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

1. NEW224Y1, HIS294Y1
2. JQR360H1
3. 3.5 full courses or their equivalent from the Core Group
4. 2.0 full courses or their equivalent from Group A
5. 2.0 full courses or their equivalent from Group B

Caribbean Studies Major (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. M. J. Newton, New College, 416-978-4054. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(6 full courses or their equivalent including two FCEs at the 300+level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

1. NEW224Y1/HIS294Y1
2. JQR360H1
3. 2.0 full courses or their equivalent from the Core Group, including at least 0.5 FCE at the 400-level
4. 2.5 full courses or their equivalent from Group A or B OR 1.5 full courses or their equivalent if taking both NEW224Y1 and HIS294Y1

Caribbean Studies Minor (Arts program)

Consult Program Director, Prof. M. J. Newton, New College, 416-978-4054. For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(4 full courses or their equivalent including two FCE at the 300+level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.

1. NEW224Y1/HIS294Y1
2. 2.0 full courses or their equivalent from the Core Group
3. 1.0 full course or its equivalent from Group A (unless both NEW224Y1 and HIS294Y1 are taken)


Caribbean Studies Course Groups

Core Group:
HIS474H1; JHN323H1; JLN327H1; NEW222H1, NEW320H1, NEW321H1, NEW324H1, NEW325H1, NEW328H1, NEW329H1, NEW421H1, NEW423H1, NEW424Y1, NEW426H1, NEW426Y1, NEW427H1, NEW428H1

Group A:
ENG366H1, ENG370H1; HIS106Y1, HIS292H1, HIS305H1, HIS312H1, HIS359H1, HIS360H1, HIS413H1, HIS446H1, HIS474H1; SPA220Y1, SPA486H1, SPA487H1, WGS375H1, WGS380H1, WGS440H1, WGS445H1, WGS462H1

Group B:
ANT316H1, ANT322H1, ANT324H1, ANT345H1, ANT346H1, ANT364H1, ANT370H1, ANT374H1, ANT420H1, ANT427H1, ANT469H1; DTS200Y1, DTS401H1, DTS402H1, DTS403H1; ENG270Y1, ENG370H1; ENV322H1, ENV422H1; FOR201H1, FOR306H1; FRE336H1; GGR240H1, GGR338H1; HAJ453H1; HIS106Y1, HIS390Y1; JPR374H1; LAS200Y1, LAS300H1, LAS301H1; NEW150Y1, NEW240Y1, NEW270H1, NEW322H1, NEW351Y1, NEW359H1; POL201Y1, POL305Y1, POL326Y1, POL417Y1, POL429H1, POL447H1, POL482H1; RLG100Y1, RLG204Y1, RLG205Y1, RLG243H1, RLG280Y1; SOC336H1, SOC383H1; WGS369H1, WGS385H1, WGS426H1, WGS463H1

Equity Studies Major (Arts program)

Consult Program Co-ordinator, Dr. J. Larkin, 416-978-8282. For general inquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

This program has unlimited enrolment and no specific admission requirements. All students who have completed at least 4.0 courses are eligible to enrol.

(7 full courses or their equivalent, including two FCEs at the 300+level)

First Year:
No specific first-year courses required.
Higher Years
1.    NEW240Y1
2.    NEW341H1
3.    JQR360H1
4.    1.5 additional full course equivalents from the core group below, including at least 0.5 at the 400-level

Although students may select from any of the core courses to fulfill the additional core group requirement, those who wish to focus on a specific area of emphasis can choose from the following series of course offerings:
Core Group:
Disability Studies: NEW241Y1, NEW270H1, NEW344Y1, NEW349H1, NEW449H1;
Global Food Equity: NEW270H1, NEW342H1, NEW442H1;
Social Advocacy:  NEW270H1, NEW345H1, NEW346H1, NEW347H1, NEW444H1, NEW445H1, NEW446H1, NEW447H1
Special Topics:  NEW348H1, NEW441H1
5.    3.5 FCEs from Groups A, B, C, and D (including one or more FCEs from at least three of the four groups)


Equity Studies Course Groups

Group A: Gender    
ANT343H1, ANT460H1; CAS360H1; CLA219H1, CLA319H1; ENG307H1, ENG355H1; FAH425H1; FRE304H1; GER421H1; GGR320H1, GGR327H1; HIS202H1, HIS205H1, HIS306H1, HIS348H1, HIS354H1, HIS363H1, HIS406H1, HIS418H1, HIS431H1, HIS446H1, HIS448H1, HIS465Y1, HIS481H1, HIS486H1; ITA455H1; JAL355H1; JNV300H1; JPP343H1; NEW325H1; NMC284H1, NMC484H1; PHL367H1; POL351H1, POL432H1, POL450H1; PSY323H1; RLG235H1, RLG313H1; SLA248H1, SLA453H1; SMC322H1; SOC265H1, SOC314H1, SOC366H1, SOC383H1, SOC465H1; SPA382H1, VIC341H1, VIC342H1, VIC343Y1; VIS209H1; WGS160Y1, WGS260H1, WGS271Y1, WGS273H1, WGS366H1, WGS367H1, WGS372H1, WGS373H1, WGS430H1

Group B: Race, Creed, Ethnicity
ANT204H1, ANT351H1, ANT365H1; ARC234H1; CAS310H1; EAS497H1; ENG270Y1, ENG355H1, ENG359H1, ENG366H1, ENG367H1, ENG368H1, ENG369H1, ENG370H1, ENG375Y1; FIN320H1; FRE336H1, HIS107Y1, HIS208Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS284Y1, HIS294Y1, HIS297Y1, HIS303H1, HIS305H1, HIS312H1, HIS338H1, HIS359H1, HIS360H1, HIS370H1, HIS383H1, HIS384H1, HIS391Y1, HIS393H1, HIS402H1, HIS408Y1, HIS412Y1, HIS413H1, HIS416H1, HIS456Y1, HIS467H1, HIS470H1, HIS474H1, HIS476H1; ITA493H1; LAS301H1, LAS302H1; NEW150Y1, NEW224Y1, NEW250Y1, NEW322H1, NEW324H1, NEW351Y1, NEW352H1, NEW359H1, NEW424Y1, NEW426H1, NEW426Y1, NEW452H1, NEW453Y1; NMC484H1; POL301Y1, POL321Y1, POL424H1; PRT255H1; RLG220H1, RLG243H1, RLG313H1, RLG315H1, RLG344H1, RLG352H1; SLA222H1; SOC210H1, SOC336H1; SPA486H1; UNI307H1

Group C: Sexual Diversities
ANT456H1; ENG273Y1, ENG384Y1; JPU315H1; PHL243H1; SOC410H1; UNI104Y1, UNI255H1, UNI256H1, UNI325H1, UNI345H1, UNI346H1, UNI354H1, UNI355H1, UNI365H1, UNI375H1, UNI377H1, UNI455H1, UNI475H1, UNI477H1; WGS374H1, WGS376H1, WGS430H1

Group D: General Equity
ABS201Y1, ABS240Y1, ABS250H1, ABS300Y1, ABS301Y1, ABS302H1, ABS303Y0, ABS322H1, ABS341H1, ABS350H1, ABS351Y1, ABS353H1, ABS360H1, ABS402H1, ABS403H1, ABS405H1; ANT204H1, ANT324H1, ANT329H1, ANT348H1, ANT353H1, ANT358H1, ANT364H1, ANT366H1, ANT427H1, ANT452H1, ANT472H1; ARC233H1; DTS200Y1, DTS401H1, DTS402H1; EAS439H1, EAS462H1; ECO332H1, ECO339Y1, ECO340H1, ECO369H1; ENG254Y1; FAH457H1; GGR112H1, GGR216H1, GGR241H1, GGR321H1, GGR328H1, GGR329H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR363H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR452H1, GGR457H1; HAJ453H1; HIS106Y1, HIS313H1, HIS323H1, HIS366H1, HIS369H1, HIS375H1, HIS424H1, HIS459H1, HIS472H1, HIS480H1, HIS489H1; HMB203H1, HMB303H1, HMB443H1; HPS324H1; JFP450H1, JGI216H1; JNH350H1; JPA354H1; JSV202H1; NEW214H1; PHL273H1, PHL281H1, PHL380H1, PHL383H1, PHL384H1; POL201Y1, POL344Y1, POL412H1, POL421H1, POL439H1, POL480H1; PRT351H1RLG317H1; SAS318H1; SOC102H1, SOC220H1, SOC301Y1, SOC309Y1, SOC355H1, SOC363H1, SOC364H1, SOC367H1, SOC453H1, SOC479H1; UNI101Y1, UNI237H1, UNI267H1, UNI330H1, UNI367H1, UNI411H1; VIC185H1, VIC351H1; VIS310H1; WDW487H1

Note: students are responsible for checking the co- and prerequisites for all courses in Groups A,B,C, and D


Human Biology

See Human Biology


Women & Gender Studies

See Women & Gender Studies


Paradigms and Archetypes Minor (Arts Program)

Note:  This program has been discontinued; students enrolled as of September 2011 will be allowed to complete it.

For general enquiries call 416-978-5404 or email nc.programs@utoronto.ca.

(4 full courses or their equivalent, including one at the 300+level)

1. NEW209Y1
2. NEW301Y1/NEW304Y1
3. One full course equivalent from NEW232Y1, NEW301Y1 (if not chosen in 2 above), NEW302Y1, NEW303H1, NEW304Y1 (if not chosen in 2 above), NEW306H1, NEW308H1, NEW402Y1, NEW403H1
4. One full course equivalent from ABS300Y1; HPS201H1, HPS202H1, HPS210H1, HPS211H1, HPS250H1; NEW332H1, NEW333H1, NEW344Y1; NMC101H1, NMC102H1; RLG200H1, RLG204Y1, RLG205Y1, RLG206Y1, RLG211Y1, RLG231H1; any NEW courses listed in 3 above.

New College Courses


New One: Learning Without Borders

The following courses are restricted to students enrolled in New One:  Learning Without Borders


NEW101Y1    Food Matters

How do we produce and ensure access to nutritious and environmentally sustainable food? Can we achieve ethical food production and global food security? What is the relationship among food science, local food movements, and global food systems? Science and social advocacy perspectives will be brought together to consider alternative food systems and topics such as the role of biotechnology, animal rights, and health and wellness. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI, Munk, SMC, TRN, UNI, VIC, and WDW One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW102Y1    Travelling Words: Language and Diversity

How does language connect and divide people, places, and communities?  Defining language broadly, topics may include language norms and policy; the politics of minority, indigenous, and global languages (such as English); translation, labeling, and meaning; academic and technical vs. everyday languages; disability and diverse ways of communicating.  Students will have opportunities to draw on their own multi-literacies and multi-lingual experiences. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI, Munk, SMC, TRN, UNI, VIC, and WDW One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW103Y1    Digital Technology in Society

How does digital technology shape how we live, think, see and imagine?  What can it contribute to projects for social change?  How are our lives affected by increased opportunities for surveillance and regulation?  From the perspectives of science, media arts, psychology, and ethics, topics may include new media and social activism; access to and control over knowledge; digitizing healthcare; and biometrics. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI, Munk, SMC, TRN, UNI, VIC, and WDW One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW104Y1    Art, Culture and Community Building

How are Toronto's diverse communities using creative art forms to build identity and make a place for themselves in the city?  Topics may include literatures of immigration and exile, First Nations' visual and performance art, re-creations of Caibbean, African, East and South Asian cultural forms, youth and LGBT visual and performance art, and artistic expression and disability. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI, Munk, SMC, TRN, UNI, VIC, and WDW One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

First Year Seminars

The 199Y1 and 199H1 seminars are designed to provide the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a class of no more than twenty-four students. These interactive seminars are intended to stimulate the students’ curiosity and provide an opportunity to get to know a member of the professorial staff in a seminar environment during the first year of study. Details can be found at www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/fyh-1/.


ELL010H1    Intensive Academic English

Students will learn strategies for improving high-level reading comprehension, listening to lectures with full understanding, and giving successful oral presentations. A series of short writing assignments will develop and apply skills in grammar, vocabulary-building, critical thinking and research. Suitable for humanities, social science and science students. This course has no credit value: it does not count toward degree requirements. For information, see http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/advising/ell/. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


IFP100Y1    Themes in World History [48L/36T]

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present using examples from across the world.  Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local developments.  Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Enrolment Limits: Enrolment is restricted to students registered in the International Foundation Program.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)

IFP100H1    Themes in World History[24L]

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present.  Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local development. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: IFP100Y1/UTP100H1
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students enrolled in the summer offering of the International Foundation Program (IFP).
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

UTP100H1    Themes in World History[24L]

Surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present.  Topics may include the environment, cultural development and interaction, the creation and nature of belief systems, political, economic and social structures, gender relations, and the relationship between global patterns and local development.

Exclusion: IFP100Y1/UTP100H1
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students enrolled in the UTPrep program.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Interdisciplinary Courses
NEW270H1    Foundations for Community Engagement[24L/12T]

Examines issues in community-based organizing, partnerships and advocacy. Drawing on interdisciplinary theory, methodology and case studies, develops skills both to analyze the social, economic, political, ethical and cultural dimensions of working with communities and to critically evaluate organizing practices and strategic approaches in community engagement.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JQR360H1    The Canadian Census: Populations, Migrations and Demographics [24L/12T]

Examines the Canadian population census through the experience of diasporic groups in Canada. Approaches the census as a statistical tool, an historical source and an ideological project of citizenship and nationalism. Uses census data to explore mathematical and statistical concepts and to integrate numerical ways of thinking with qualitative analysis. (Jointly sponsored by African Studies, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, Caribbean Studies, Equity Studies and Latin American Studies).

Prerequisite: DTS200Y1/NEW150Y1/NEW224Y1/NEW240Y1/LAS200Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW471H1    Interdisciplinary Special Topics[24S]

Topics vary from year to hear depending on the instructor.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory
NEW302Y1    C.G. Jung: Stories, Patterns, Symbols[48L/24S]

Impact of Jung's analytical psychology, critical methodology and interpretative practice on issues in religion, anthropology, art and literature, popular culture, gender studies and postmodernist critique. Theoretical studies include traditional Jungian and contemporary post-Jungian texts together with feminist and non-Jungian sources.

Prerequisite: Four FCEs, at least one of which should be in the humanities
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW303H1    Hypotheses of the Unconscious[12L/12S]

Current discussions of the hypotheses, starting with Freud's and Jung's hypotheses, especially Jung's collective unconscious; critical examination through retrospective analysis of the evolution and development of the concept in works from philosophy, psychology, poetry, ethnology, science and popular culture that anticipated, influenced or were influenced by the work of Freud and Jung, post-Freudians and post-Jungians.

Prerequisite: Four FCEs, at least one of which should be in the humanities
Recommended Preparation: NEW302Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW402Y1    Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory[48S]

Topics vary from year to year, depending on the interests of students and instructors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW403H1    Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory[24S]

Topics vary from year to year depending on the interests of students and instructors.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

African Studies Courses
NEW150Y1    Introduction to African Studies[48L]

A multi-disciplinary study of Africa, emphasizing inquiry and critical analysis. Pre-colonial, colonial and contemporary African history, anthropology, politics, African humanism and society, religion, art, music, race, resistance, gender and Pan-Africanism.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW250Y1    Africa in the 21st Century: Challenges and Opportunities[48L/24T]

An introduction to the study of Africa as a living place rather than merely a site for intellectual speculation and study. Explores the issues that engage the attention of ordinary Africans, ranging from the dramatic to the seemingly trivial but quotidian concerns that occupy our lives. Topics will include urban life, family networks, kinship and social capital, religion and belief systems, indigenous government, politics, economics, courts and judicial processes, migration, and land tenure. Materials studied will include various African media in Toronto radio, television, newspapers, literature, religion, politics, sports, music, film and food as well as BBC World Service, allAfrica and Panapress and several African socio-cultural journals and texts.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW280Y1    Introductory Swahili[24L/72T]

Introduction to grammar and basic vocabulary of Swahili. Emphasis on comprehension and oral practice. Reading of selected texts. Relation of the language to its East African cultural context.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW322H1    The Contemporary African Novel (formerly NEW322Y1)[24S]

Novels written in the last forty years by English, French and Portuguese-speaking Africans. Ideological views concerning colonialism and neo-colonialism. Tradition, religious and secular; the use of African symbolism. A small number of historical and sociological texts are recommended as essential background reading. Works not written in English are read in translation. (Offered in alternate years)

Exclusion: NEW322Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JNH350H1    AIDS : Challenges and Successes (formerly NEW350H1) [24L]

Explores the pandemic of AIDS in Africa through a social science lens. (Given by Human Biology and New College)

Exclusion: NEW350H1
Recommended Preparation: NEW150Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW351Y1    African Systems of Thought (formerly NEW252Y1)[48L]

The exploration of a range of African cosmologies, epistemologies, and theologies, as well as specific case studies on justice, the moral order, and gender relations. The influence of these richly diverse traditions is traced as well in the writings of African thinkers in the Diaspora.

Exclusion: NEW252Y1, JAP256H1/JAP356H1
Recommended Preparation: NEW150Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW352H1    International Organizations, NGOs, Development and Change in Africa[24L]

Critically explores the role of international organizations such as the World Bank Group, the UN and NGOs in the economic development of Africa.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/NEW250Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW353H1    International Relations of Africa[24L]

Explores inter-state relations in Africa, African states’ relations with the West, China, India, Brazil, and international political, economic and financial institutions.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/NEW250Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW358H1    Special Topics in African Studies [24L]

An upper level course.  Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/NEW250Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW359H1    Humanitarianism Industry and Africa[24L]

Examines the role of humanitarian actors and organizations in economic development, human rights and democracy promotion, resolution of conflicts and post-conflict reconstruction in Africa.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/NEW250Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JQR360H1  The Canadian Census:  Populations, Migrations and Demographics [24L, 12T]

See Interdisciplinary Courses above.


NEW380Y1    Intermediate Swahili[24L/72T]

Grammar and syntax. Conversation and written composition. Reading of texts: literary, journalistic. Relation of the language to its East African context.

Prerequisite: NEW280Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW450Y1    Advanced Topics in African Studies[24S]

A required course for all Specialists and Majors in the African Studies Program, enrolment is restricted to students enrolled in the program in their final year of study. The seminar is taught by the core faculty in the African Studies Program and is designed to build upon the accumulated knowledge of students and the interdisciplinary nature of the program. Topics vary from year to year.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW451H1    Special Topics in African Studies[24L]

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW250Y1/POL301Y1/permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW452H1    Negotiating Peace in Africa[24S]

Examines approaches and styles employed by diplomats to resolve conflicts in Africa.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1, NEW250Y1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW453Y1    Language and Postcolonial Education in East Africa [48S]

Examines the choice of languages for education in East Africa using critical perspectives. Pays particular attention to the influences of the historical experience of colonialism, the socio-linguistic contours of each country and the strength of linguistic and educational lobby groups in East African countries.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/NEW250Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health Courses
NEW214H1    Socially Engaged Buddhism (formerly NEW214Y1)[24L]

A comprehensive survey of socially engaged Buddhism. Particular focus on contemporary movements in Vietnam, Tibet, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India. The role of women in Buddhism.

Exclusion: NEW214Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW214Y1    Socially Engaged Buddhism [48L]

A comprehensive survey of socially engaged Buddhism. Particular focus on contemporary movements in Vietnam, Tibet, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India. The role of women in Buddhism.

Exclusion: NEW214H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW232Y1    Buddhist Psychology: Theories & Applications (formerly NEW402Y1, NEW432Y1)[72S]

Explores the contributions of Buddhism to the study of human consciousness and behaviour. Focus is on the expanding academic discourse on the intersection of Buddhist and Western theories of psychology, phenomenology and psychotherapy. Includes analyses of the application of Buddhist mindfulness meditation in clinical interventions for mental and physical disorders.

Exclusion: NEW402Y1, NEW432Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW331H1    Buddhism and the Science of Mindfulness Meditation[24S]

Examines the modern mindfulness movement from a scientific and Buddhist perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the key Buddhist sutras and commentaries related to the practice of mindfulness and their relation the mindfulness meditation practices increasingly popular in the West.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW332H1    Buddhism and Psychotherapy[24S]

Evaluates the relationship between Buddhist psychology and the practice of Western psychotherapy. Areas that will be studied include positive psychology, psychoanalysis, cognitive-behaviour therapy, mindfulness meditation and Jungian psychology. Comparisons with original Buddhist teachings and commentaries will be made.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW333H1    Buddhism and Cognitive Science[36L]

Explores some important connections between Cognitive Science and Buddhism. In particular it will examine the insights of cognitive science into central Buddhist concepts such as wisdom, mindfulness, meditation, insight and self-control, as well as related concepts such as flow and mystical experience.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1/RLG206Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW334H1    Science of Wisdom: Buddhist and Western Traditions [36L]

Provides a conceptual and practical exploration of several ancient wisdom traditions.  Buddhist approaches to self-actualization and wisdom will be compared to four Western sites of wisdom (i.e., Mesopotamia, ancient Greece, Christian monasticism, Renaissance). Includes guided experiential exercises for each of the wisdom traditions.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW336H1    Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health [36L]

Topics vary from year to year depending on the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW339H1    Yogacara Buddhism and Western Psychology [36L]

A comparative study of mind in Indian Yogacara Buddhism and modern psychology. Yogacara teachings address the three aspects of mind, the storehouse consciousness, and the notion that the root of all phenomena is mind, allowing a dialogue with the modern scientific understanding of the mind in psychology.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW432H1    Advanced Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health [24S]

An upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1/RLG206Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW433H1    Advanced Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health [24S]

An upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1/RLG206Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW438H1    Research Seminar in Buddhist Psychology (formerly NEW338H1) [24L]

Critically evaluates the empirical research literature relevant to the study of Buddhist psychology. Conceptual, methodological and interpretive limitations of the scientific literature are discussed. Students will apply their understanding by designing an experiment to empirically evaluate an aspect of Buddhist psychology.

Prerequisite: a statistics course (e.g. PSY201H1, SOC202H1, STA220H1)
Exclusion: NEW338H1
Recommended Preparation: NEW232Y1/NEW331H1/NEW333H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

Caribbean Studies Courses
NEW222H1    Comparative Caribbean Literature[24L]

Introduction to the rich and multi-linguistic literary traditions of the Caribbean and its diaspora.  Texts not originally written in English are read in translation.  Analysis of the relationship between these texts and wider society.

Exclusion: NEW223Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW224Y1    Caribbean Thought I[72L]

A multi-disciplinary exploration of writing pertaining to culture and consciousness, particularly Afro- and Indo-Caribbean thought: theoretical perspectives on the implications and consequences of slavery and indenture, the struggle for freedom from the legacy of the plantation and colonial dependence, responses to domination and exploitation, race, gender, religion and music.

Recommended Preparation: HIS106Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW259H1    World Music Ensemble: Steel Pan[48P]

Rehearsal, performance and study of Steel Pan ensemble.

Prerequisite: permission of the Caribbean Studies Program Director
Exclusion: PMU272H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW320H1    The Historical Geography of the Caribbean (1400-1800)[24L]

Examines the multidimensional effects that geography and the Caribbean environment have had on its history of human occupation.  Topics include environmental analysis (landforms; oceans and seas; navigation; flora; fauna; climate; hurricanes), migration, trade, cartography, and definitions of region.

Recommended Preparation: NEW224Y1/HIS294Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW321H1    Caribbean Visual Arts, Social Media and Performance[24L]

Explores themes relating to visual arts, social media and theatre in the Caribbean.  Topics may include:  theatre, film, mixed media arts, the role of the internet and online publishing in the arts and the relationship between artists, the state and wider society.

Recommended Preparation: NEW224Y1/HIS294Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JHN323H1    Indigeneity in the Caribbean[24L]

Explores the legacies of the pre-Columbian era, as well as the post-1492 experiences of people of pre-Columbian Caribbean ancestry.  Examines the origins and consequences of the Caribbean's narrative of "indigenous absence", as well as the relationship between indigeneity, globalization and diaspora.

Prerequisite: HIS294Y1/NEW224Y1/ABS201Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW324H1    The Contemporary Caribbean in a Global Context[24L]

This upper level course examines the interplay between wider global processes and intra-regional responses that together help shape contemporary Caribbean realities.  Topics include:  economic crisis and structural adjustment; tourism; the agricultural sector; the Caribbean Single Market and Economy; migration and diaspora.

Prerequisite: NEW224Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW325H1    Caribbean Women Thinkers[24L]

An examination of the historical and political significance of writings (literary, political, scholarly) by Caribbean women who engage problems within Caribbean culture and provide insights into the endeavours of the peoples of the region.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JLN327H1    Regional Perspectives on the Hispanic Caribbean[24L]

Explores the Hispanic areas of the Caribbean including the Caribbean areas of continental Spanish-speaking America.  Topics may include: regional politics, stage and economy; revolutions and authoritarian regimes; popular culture, the arts and media; religion and society; gender and sexuality; state structures; diasporas and migration.

Recommended Preparation: HIS294Y1/LAS200Y1/NEW224Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW328H1    Caribbean Indentureship and its Legacies[24L]

Explores indentured migration and its legacies from the 17th century through to the present.  Encourages students to think comparatively and transnationally about indentureship and diaspora, as well as indentured migration's relationship to contract and labour law.

Exclusion: NEW326Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS294Y1/NEW224Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW329H1    Special Topics in Caribbean Studies[24L]

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW224Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

JQR360H1  The Canadian Census:  Populations, Migrations and Demographics [24L, 12T]

See Interdisciplinary Courses above.


NEW421H1    Global Perspectives on the Haitian Revolution[24S]

Examines the colonial pre-history of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804).  Explores how this transatlantic revolution unfolded, including the emancipation of slaves, Toussaint, Louverture, and the roles played by Spain, the United States and Britain.  A reflection on the Revolution in contemporary literature and film.

Prerequisite: NEW224Y1/HIS294Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW423H1    Special Topics in Caribbean Studies[24S]

An upper-level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: NEW324Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW424Y1    The Capitalist Press and the New Imperialism (formerly NEW424H1)[72S]

Social analysis of the state-corporate mainstream capitalist press (print/electronic) problematically named The Free Press; its racist-sexist globalizing EuroAmerican cultural imperialism; the production of the commoditized consumer-subject and other re-conquest narratives and their implications for Caribbean and other World Majority peoples.

Prerequisite: NEW224Y1, NEW324Y1
Exclusion: NEW424H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW426H1    Special Topics in Caribbean Studies[36S]

An upper level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: NEW324Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW426Y1    Special Topics in Caribbean Studies[72S]

An upper level seminar. Topics vary from year to year, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: NEW324Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW427H1    Advanced Topics: The Hispanic Caribbean[24S]

Explores, in depth, a country in the Hispanic Caribbean or a theme relating to the Hispanic Caribbean.  Topics vary each year and may include:  Cuban society; Hispanic Caribbean revolutions; Hispanic Caribbean music, art and popular cultures; Hispanic Caribbean diasporas.

Prerequisite: HIS294Y1/JLN327H1/NEW224Y1
Recommended Preparation: JLN327H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW428H1    Caribbean Migrations and Diasporas[24S]

Examines Caribbean migration in the post-slavery era.  Topics include:  Caribbean diasporas in the West; labour migrations such as the Panama Canal migration; Caribbean migrant communities in Central America; intra-regional migrations between the Caribbean islands; 'guest worker' programs; remittances and their impact; heritage tourism and 'return' migrations.

Prerequisite: NEW224Y1/NEW324H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Equity Studies Courses
NEW240Y1    Introduction to Equity Studies[48L/24T]

An interdisciplinary study of social justice issues in local and global contexts.  Examines ongoing and new forms of inequity and various approaches to social change.  Topics include the origins of inequities, critical anti-racism, global labour patterns, economic restructuring, gender variance, disability studies, food security and the politics of resistance.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW241Y1    Introduction to Disability Studies[48L/24T]

Introduces students to the theory and practice of Disability Studies. Explores the history of the development of disability studies. Examines cultural representations of disability and critically assesses the ways disability is conceptualized in societal institutions. Forms of disability activism are also discussed.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW270H1 Foundations for Community Engagement

See Interdisciplinary Courses above.


NEW341H1    Theorizing Equity[24S]

Explores theories that inform Equity Studies and situates them historically to examine both the social conditions and practices that generate inequities and the responses by equity advocates. Examines texts in relevant fields such as post-colonial theory, queer theory, disability studies, feminist theory and transnational studies.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW342H1    Theory and Praxis in Food Security[24S]

Explores the concept of food security in the context of equity issues related to global food systems. Students participate in food-related field work activities outside of regular classroom time.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW344Y1    Equity and the Body[48L]

An analysis of the body as the product of complex social organizations, processes and structures. Examines cultural narratives recounted about the body through topics that include genetics, beauty, health, pathology and the multiples identities that intersect at the site of the body.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW345H1    Equity and Activism in Education[24L]

Examines contemporary issues in education and schooling from a social justice and equity perspective. Engages with a variety of theoretical frameworks including anti-homophobia education, critical pedagogy, critical race theory, decolonizing knowledges, and intersectionality. Includes an overview of educational activist projects.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW346H1    Community Development in Local and Global Contexts[24L]

An interdisciplinary approach to community development that considers the changing roles of community organizations and non-profits in the context of neoliberalism.  Examines the political economy of community development in Canada, the impact on marginalized groups, and emerging forms of collaboration across sectors and geographic (including national) localities.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW347H1    Critical Race and Anti-Racism Studies[36L]

Considers what it means to pursue integrative anti-racism in organizational/institutional settings such as the workplace, justice system, media and education through a study of theories on race and philosophical tenets of anti-racism.  Examines the concept of race as a pedagogical discourse and social-political practice across local, national and global contexts.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW348H1    Special Topics in Equity Studies[24L]

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW349H1    Disability and Representation[24S]

Explores the connection between disability and representation through contemporary social theries and methods in disability studies. Problematizes disability representation to challenge the taken-for-granted cultural assumption that disability is a problem that requires a solution.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JQR360H1  The Canadian Census:  Populations, Migrations and Demographics [24L, 12T]

See Interdisciplinary Courses above.


NEW441H1    Advanced Topics in Equity Studies[24S]

An advanced level seminar course. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW442H1    Food Systems and the Politics of Resistance[36L]

Examines the food we eat in the local and global context of food systems, food sovereignty and food movements.  Explores the possibilities for food as a catalyst for learning, resistance and social change.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1, NEW342H1, and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW444H1    Social Change and Non-Violence[24S]

Examines theories and practices that promote the building of cooperative, non-violent communities. Grounded in a series of historical cases studies, the course critically considers Gandhian principles and the ways in which these have been translated into collective action.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW445H1    Anti-Oppression Education in School Settings[24L]

Identifies ways systems of oppression and oppressive educational practices manifest themselves in school settings. Discusses how educators can use these settings or create new spaces to do anti-oppressive educational work. Integrates anti-oppressive educational theories with anti-oppressive school practice.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1, NEW345H1 and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW446H1    Community Development and Social Change[36L]

Explores the significance of community development as a social change strategy, through a critical social analysis of local and global case studies and policies.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1, NEW346H1, and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW447H1    Race, Ethnicity and Educational Praxis[36L]

An application of critical race, ehtnicity and social difference discourse to educational praxis.  Examines the articulation of theoretical perspectives to explain particular incidents in society, and to understand forms of institutional racism and emerging minority responses.  Explores the implications for pedagogical practices in education.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1, NEW347H1 and one additional half-course at the 300+ level in Equity Studies; permission of Program Director
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW449H1    Contemporary Theories in Disability Studies[24S]

Explores the influence of contemporary social theory in the formation of Disability Studies and its contemporary expressions. Examines how contemporary feminist theory, queer theory, and post-colonial theory intersect with Disability Studies to develop an understanding of disability as a socio-political phenomenon.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1/NEW241Y and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Paradigms and Archetypes Courses
NEW209Y1    Stories: Constructs of Knowledge[48L/24T]

Examines cross-disciplinary issues raised by the telling and retelling of stories: sequence and consequence; narrative as argument and proof by scenario; construction and deconstruction of identities; instabilities amongst history, fact, fiction, myth, law and science. Works by Certeau, Darwin, Davis, Foucault, Freud, Gould, Kincaid, Kuhn, Plato, etc.

Prerequisite: Four course credits
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW301Y1    Analogy and Its Rituals[48L/24T]

Issues of rhetorical proof, analysis and interpretation in open (alogical) systems; mediation and the media; the scandal of chaos; motives for metaphor, custom and culture, anatomies of reason, idea and ideology. Works by Aristotle, Beckett, Camus, Kafka, Langer, McLuhan, Ryle, Plato, Shelley, etc. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NEW209Y
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW302Y1  Carl Jung:  Stories, Patterns, Symbols [48L, 24S]

See Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory above.

NEW303H1  Hypotheses of the Unconscious [12L, 12S]

See Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory above.


NEW304Y1    Dilemmas[48L/24T]

Issues raised by the problem/solution paradigm and the construction of truth as binary; strategies of paradox, aporia, paradigm anomaly, enigma, puzzlement; mystery and mystification; crisis, crux and apocalypse. Works by Borges, Carroll, Dostoevski, Freud, Mill, Nishitani, Rorty, Ryle, Sophocles, Watson, etc,. (Offered in alternate years)

Recommended Preparation: NEW209Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1) + Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW306H1    Rabindranath Tagore: Paradigms of Culture[24L]

Examines Tagores concepts of humanity, art, personality, freedom, nationalism, ashram, science, education. Evaluates Tagores literary contribution, his work in rural reconstruction, and Tagore-Gandhi tensions over education and the non-cooperation movement. Reading knowledge of Bengali not presumed; however students with knowledge of language are encouraged to read materials in Bengali.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW308H1    Satyajit Ray: Paradigms of Vision[24L]

Examines the artistic vision of Satyajit Ray as chronicler of Bengali culture and one of the greatest filmmakers of our time: his life and work; his films as expressions of his humane vision; cultural orientation and values; fictional compositions, visual and musical artistry; affinities and continuity with Rabindranath Tagore. Reading knowledge of Bengali not presumed; however students with knowledge of language are encouraged to read materials in Bengali.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW402Y1  Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory [48]

See Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory above.

NEW403H1  Advanced Special Topics in Jungian Theory [24S]

See Interdisciplinary Courses in Jungian Theory above.


Independent Studies Courses

 New College Independent Study courses are designed both to complement regular offerings in New College programs and to provide an opportunity for New College students in any program to enrich their studies. The normal expectation of a project course is that the student, aided and advised by the supervisor, will read relevant literature, and plan, execute, analyze and report on an original and independent investigation of an appropriate topic. Written applications (detailed proposal, reading list and a letter of support from a faculty member who is prepared to supervise) should be made through the Program Office for approval by the College’s Committee for Academic Affairs by May 1 for the Summer Session or by the last Friday in August for the Fall & Winter Session. Students will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of an application. For more information and application forms, please see the Independent Studies website: http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/programs/independent .htm

Enquiries: New College, room 133 (978-5404)


NEW299Y1    Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW390Y1    New College Independent Studies[TBA]

New College Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of College
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a TBA course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW391H1    New College Independent Studies[TBA]

New College Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of College
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a TBA course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW490Y1    New College Independent Studies[TBA]

New College Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of College
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a None course
Breadth Requirement: None

NEW491H1    New College Independent Studies[TBA]

New College Independent Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of College
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a None course
Breadth Requirement: None

Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Courses

New College offers several community engaged (or service learning) courses.  These provide students the opportunity to integrate academic knowledge and experiential learning through participation in activities and knowledge production in community or campus organizations.

Two forms of community engaged learning courses are offered:  embedded and independent.  In the former, a community service component is integrated in the course syllabus.  This may be mandatory or optional.  (Examples of such courses are NEW342H1 and NEW232Y1) In the independent community engaged learning courses (see below) upper level students, with various academic backgrounds, are placed for one or two terms with a community or campus-based organization.  Through critical reflection on their experiences, students deepen and nuance their academic knowledge, learn more about social justice work and community engagement, explore social and ethical issues, build professional and work-place skills, and develop capacity for self-authorship. 

Information about the CEL Program can be found at http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/academics/new-college-academic-programs/community-engaged-learning/

Enquiries: nc.servicelearning@utoronto.ca or 416-978-8821


NEW495Y1    Independent Community Engaged Learning[96P/24S]

Students apply in the late summer for available placements with New College partner organizations.  Students' learning is facilitated by academic and placement supervision, regular reflective writing, and collective reflection in a seminar that meets about 10 times over the year.  A symposium in early April showcases students' learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: NEW150Y1/NEW214H1/NEW224Y1/ NEW232Y1/NEW240Y1/NEW241Y1/NEW270H1/other NEW courses
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW496H1    Independent Community Engaged Learning[48P/12S]

Note:  Offered only in special circumstances.  See description under NEW495Y1 above. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: NEW150Y1/NEW214H1/NEW224Y1/ NEW232Y1/NEW240Y1/NEW241Y1/NEW270H1/other NEW courses
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)