Faculty of Arts & Science
2014-2015 Calendar

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Geography

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
L.S. Bourne, MA, Ph D, FRSC, DES Hons
J.N.H. Britton, MA, Ph D
R.B. Bryan, BA Ph D (Forestry)
I. Burton, Ph D, FRSC
A.J. Dakin, Ph D, ARIBA, FRTPI
G.H.K. Gad, Dr Phil, Ph D (UTM)
J.H. Galloway, MA, Ph D (V)
G. Gracie, BA Sc, Ph D (UTM)
B. Greenwood, B Sc, Ph D, Ph D Hons (UTSC)
R. Jaakson, M Sc (Pl), Ph D (UTM)
T.F. McIlwraith, MA, Ph D (UTM)
D.S. Munro, M Sc, Ph D (UTM)
E.C. Relph, M Phil, Ph D
S.T. Roweis, M Sc (Pl), Ph D (I)
J.W. Simmons, MA, Ph D
A. Waterhouse, M Sc (Pl), Ph D
J.B.R. Whitney, MA, Ph D

Associate Professors Emeriti
M.F. Bunce, BA, Ph D (UTSC)
A. M. Davis, PhD
D. A. McQuillan, PhD
A.G. Price, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)

Associate Professor and Chair of the Department, Graduate Chair
V.W. Maclaren, M Pl, MS, PhD

Professors
J.M. Chen, B Sc, Ph D, FRSC
A.G. Daniere, MPP, Ph D (UTM)
J.R. Desloges, M Sc, Ph D
M.S. Gertler, MCP, Ph D, FRSC
J. Hackworth, MA, MEP, Ph D
L.D.D. Harvey, M Sc, Ph D
D. Leslie, MA, Ph D
R.D. Lewis, MA, Ph D
J.R. Miron, MA, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
W.S. Prudham, MA, Ph D
S. Ruddick, MA, Ph D
K. Wilson, MA, Ph D (Chair, UTM)

Associate Professors
G. Arhonditsis, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
A. Boland, MAIS, Ph D
R. Buliung, MA, Ph D (UTM)
T. Conway, MS, Ph D (UTM)
D. Cowen, MScPl, PhD
P. Desrochers, Ph D (UTM)
R.J. DiFrancesco, MA, Ph D
M. Farish, BA. Ph D
E. Gilbert, MA, Ph D
K. Goonewardena, M Pl, Ph D
W. Gough, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
P. Hess, MEP, Ph D
M. Hunter, MA, Ph D (UTSC)
T.V. Kepe, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
K. MacDonald, MA, Ph D (UTSC)
M. Mahtani, BA, Ph D (UTSC)
D. McGregor, MES, Ph D
C. Mitchell, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
K.N. Rankin, MRP, Ph D
V.B. Robinson, MS, Ph D (UTM)
M. Siemiatycki, M Sc, Ph D
R. Silvey, MA, Ph D
A. Sorensen, M Sc, Ph D, Chair, Human Geography (UTSC)
S. Wakefield, MA, Ph D
A. Walks, MA, Ph D (UTM)
M. Wells, B Sc, Ph D (UTSC)

Assistant Professors
C. Abizaid, MA, PhD
M. Buckley, D Phil (UTSC)
S. Bunce, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
T. Duval, M Sc, Ph D (UTM)
M. Ekers, MES, D Phil (UTSC)
J. Han, Ph D (UTSC)
Y. He B Sc, M Sc, Ph D (UTM)
M. Isaac, M Sc, Ph D (UTSC)
R. Isakson, BA, Ph D (UTSC)
R. Narayanareddy, Ph D (UTSC)
A. Olive, MA, Ph D (UTM)
Z. Taylor, M Sc Pl, MA, Ph D (UTSC)

Senior Lecturers
D. Boyes, M Sc, Ph D
J. Leydon, MA, Ph D (UTM)
B. Murck, BA, Ph D (UTM)

Introduction

Geography is the study of the environments created on the earth’s surface by nature and people. The physical and biological elements of these environments, as well as their economic and social structure, historical development, spatial organization, interrelationships, management and planning form the subject matter of Geography. Geography, therefore, relates closely to other fields in natural science, social science and the humanities, and geographers take courses in these related fields along with their geography courses. Students specializing in other subjects often select one or more geography courses to deepen their understanding of the resource base, culture and economy of those parts of the world in which they are interested.

Employment opportunities for geographers exist in many branches of international organizations, government, industry, and education. Geographers work at all levels of government service, especially in agencies responsible for environmental management; land and resource analysis; development of historic districts and sites; urban transportation planning; urban and regional development planning; trade promotion; community social services; geographic systems design and data analysis; transport network design and the processing of archival, survey, and cartographic information. In business, geographers work in marketing, locational analysis, resource development, and in consulting firms engaged in project evaluation, land use planning and natural heritage conservation. They often also find work in the non-profit sector as policy analysts, cartographers and geographic information science specialists, community organizers, and educators.

Students studying Geography may take either an H.B.A. or H.B.Sc., depending upon the subjects they wish to emphasize. The Department offers Specialist, Major and Minor Programs in Geography, and contributes courses to various departmental and college programs including American Studies; Anthropology; Archaeology; Canadian Studies and Peace and Conflict Studies; Equity Studies; Centre for Environment; Environmental Geosciences; Urban Studies; Ethics, Society and Law and International Relations; and European Studies. Counselling and advice may be obtained from the Associate Chair, Undergraduate or the Undergraduate Counsellor.

Associate Chair, Undergraduate:
Professor A. Boland, Sidney Smith Hall, Room 5006 (416-978-1587)

Undergraduate Counsellor:
K. Giesbrecht, Sidney Smith Hall, Room 5044 (416-978-6455)

General Enquiries:416-978-3375

Geography Programs

For 2014-15

Admission to major and specialist programs will be determined by a student's mark in 0.5-1.0 GGR FCEs at the 100 and/or 200 level. See program descriptions for details on the entry requirements. These are limited enrolment programs that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving the marks required does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Double majors in Geography may only overlap 1.0 FCE.  Students combining any of our Minor programs with a Specialist/Major program would normally be allowed to overlap only 1.5 FCEs towards both programs. Students that choose to specialize or major in one of the three Geography programs cannot minor in the same program but may do so in another Geography program. Double minors can overlap 1.0 FCE.

Generally, students may only take 1.0 Independent Research Project FCE toward their program requirements.

Environment & Energy Minor (Science Program)

Environment and Energy (Science Program) – Joint Program with the School of the Environment

Note: Students combining this program with a Specialist/Major sponsored by the Department of Geography will normally be allowed to count only 1.5 (of the 4.0) FCEs towards both programs.

Jointly sponsored by the School of the Environment and the Department of Geography, this interdisciplinary program addresses the scientific, technological, environmental and policy aspects of energy use and supply, with a focus on the reduction of environmental impacts.

Minor Entry Requirements: Note that the four full course equivalents that constitute the Minor Program are those listed below under “Higher Years.” Consult David Powell, Undergraduate Student Advisor, School of the Environment, Room 1049A, Earth Sciences Centre, 416-946-8100 or david.powell@utoronto.ca

Number of half courses Courses FCEs
A: First Year: At least 2 FCE from among  (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1 and at least one FCE from among CHM138H1, CHM139H1, CHM151Y1; PHY131H1, PHY132H1, PHY151H1, PHY152H1  
B: All ENV221H1, ENV222H1/GGR222H1/GGR223H1 1.0
C: All ENV346H1, ENV350H1, ENV450H1  1.5
D: All  (GGR314H1, GGR333H1)/(GGR347H1, GGR348H1 1.0
E: Any  CHM210H1, CHM310H1, CHM415H1; ENV235H1/ENV235Y1, ENV237H1, ENV238H1; FOR310H1, FOR410H1; GGR203H1, GGR303H1, GGR314H1 (if not taken for section D), GGR403H1; HPS313H1; PHY231H1, PHY250H1  0.5
Total   4.0

Environmental Geography Specialist (Arts program)

Specialist Entry Requirements:

Admission will be determined by one of the following:

0.5 GGR FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 77% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 70% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of half courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2  GGR107H1 (recommended), GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR112H1GGR124H1 (or other GGR course with permission of the Department) 1.0
B: Any 2 GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR333H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, JGE236H1ENV200H1, ENV234H1 1.0
C: All   GGR223H1, GGR270H1, GGR271H1, GGR272H1, JGE331H1   2.5
D: Any 1 GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1, 0.5
E.  Either  GGR491Y1 or one of GGR416H1, GGR492H1, GGR497H1 and one additional 0.5 FCE 400 level course from Group A or Group B  (below) 1.0
F: Any 8 half courses or equivalent  Up to 4.0 FCE from Group A; up to 1.5 FCE can be from Group B; up to 1.0 FCE can be from Group C. (below)  4.0
Note:
At least 4.0 FCEs must be 300/400 series courses.  Of these, at least 1.0 FCE must be 400 series. 
   
Total   10.0

Environmental Geography Major (Arts program)

 Major Entry Requirements:

Admission is based on one of the following:

0.5 GGR FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 73% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 67% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of half courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2 GGR107H1 (recommended), GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1 (or other GGR course with permission of the Department)  1.0
B: Any 2 GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR308H1GGR314H1, GGR333H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, JGE236H1ENV200H1, ENV234H1 1.0
C: All   GGR223H1, GGR270H1, GGR271H1   1.5
D: Any 1 GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1 0.5
E. Any 1 0.5 FCE at the 400 level from Group A (below) 0.5
F: Any 5 half courses or equivalent Up to 2.5 FCE from Group A; up to 1.0 FCE can be from Group B; up to 0.5 FCE can be from Group C (below) 2.5
Note: At least 2.0 FCEs must be 300/400 series courses.  Of these, at least 0.5 FCE must be 400 series.       
Total   7.0

Environmental Geography Minor (Arts program)

Minor Entry Requirements: There are no entry requirements for this program

Number of half courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 1:  GGR107H1 (recommended), GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR112H1GGR124H1 (or other GGR course with permission of the Department)   0.5
B: Mandatory: GGR223H1 0.5
NEWC. Any 1: GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR333H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, JGE236H1, ENV200H1, ENV234H1 0.5
D. Up to 2.5 FCE from Group A; up to 1.0 FCE from Group B (below) 2.5
Note:
At least 1.0 FCE must be 300/400 series courses.
   
Total   4.0

 


Environmental Geography Groups

GROUP A (Geography Courses)

GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR223H1, GGR272H1, GGR273H1, GGR301H1, GGR303H1, GGR305H1, GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR321H1, GGR329H1, GGR333H1, GGR334H1, GGR337H1, GGR338H1, GGR340H1, GGR341H1GGR347H1, GGR348H1, GGR373H1, GGR381H1, GGR398H1, GGR399Y1, GGR403H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1, GGR416H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR434H1, GGR438H1, GGR491Y1, GGR492H1, GGR497H1, GGR498H1JFG470H1, JFG475H1; JGE236H1, JGE321H1, JGE331H1, JGE347H1, JGE348H1; JUG320H1; FOR310H1

GROUP B (School of the Environment courses)

ENV200H1, ENV234H1ENV307H1, ENV323H1, ENV333H1, ENV335H1, ENV350H1, ENV422H1

GROUP C

Any other geography courses at the 200/300/400 level not listed in Group A

Human Geography Specialist (Arts program)

Specialist Entry Requirements:

Admission will be determined by one of the following:

0.5 GGR FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 77% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 70% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2  GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1 (or 1.0 other GGR courses with permission of Department) 1.0
B: Any 1 not used to satisfy A  GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, JGE236H1  0.5
C: All 3 GGR270H1, GGR271H1, GGR272H1  1.5
D: Any 1 GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1 0.5
E: Any 2 Any two 400 series GGR courses, at least one of which must be from Group E (below)  1.0
F: Any 11 half courses or equivalent not used to satisfy E or D Up to 5.5 FCE's from Group E (below); Up to 1.5 FCE's can be from Group F 5.5
Note:
At least 4.0 FCEs must be 300/400 series courses. Of these, at least 1.0 FCE must be 400 series. 
   
Total   10.0

 

Human Geography Major (Arts program)

Major Entry Requirements:

Admission is based on one of the following:

0.5 GGR FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 73% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 67% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2 GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1 (or 1.0 other GGR courses with permission of Department)  1.0
B: Any 1 not used to satisfy A  GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, JGE236H1  0.5
C: All   GGR270H1, GGR271H1 1.0
D: Any 1  GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1 0.5
E: Any 1 Any 400 series course from Group E (below) 

0.5

F: Any 7 half courses or equivalent not used to satisfy E or D

Up to 3.5 FCE's from Group E (below); Up to 1.0 FCE's can be from Group F 

3.5
Note:
At least 2.0 FCEs must be 300/400 series courses.  Of these, at least 0.5 must be 400 series. 
   
Total   7.0

Human Geography Minor (Arts program)

Minor Entry Requirements: There are no entry requirements for this program

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2 GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1 (or 1.0 other GGR courses with permission of Department)  1.0
 B: Any 6 Three other higher level GGR/JFG/JGE/JGI/JUG social science or humanities FCE's, including at least 1.0 FCE of 300/400-series courses
Up to 0.5 FCE can be from Group F
3.0
Total   4.0

Human Geography Groups

GROUP E Optional courses for Human Geography:
GGR216H1, GGR220H1, GGR221H1GGR223H1GGR225H1, GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR246H1, GGR252H1, GGR254H1, GGR272H1, GGR273H1, GGR299Y1, GGR300H1, GGR314H1, GGR320H1, GGR321H1, GGR323H1, GGR327H1, GGR328H1, GGR329H1, GGR334H1, GGR336H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR340H1GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1, GGR352H1, GGR356H1, GGR357H1, GGR358H1, GGR359H1, GGR360H1, GGR361H1, GGR363H1GGR373H1, GGR374H1, GGR381H1, GGR382H1, GGR398H1/399H1, GGR400H1GGR416H1GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR421H1, GGR424H1, GGR431H1, GGR433H1, GGR434H1, GGR438H1, GGR439H1, GGR452H1, GGR457H1, GGR458H1, GGR462H1, GGR473H1, GGR482H1, GGR491Y1, GGR492H1, GGR492Y1, GGR497H1GGR499H1; JGE321H1, JGE331H1; JUG320H1; JGI216H1, JGI346H1, JGI454H1; JFG470H1, JFG475H1

Group F (Optional science courses)
GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR301H1, GGR303H1, GGR305H1, GGR308H1, GGR333H1, GGR337H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, GGR403H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1, GGR498H1; JGE236H1; FOR310H1

Course Clusters

Students may wish to choose courses from among one or more of the following clusters if they want to concentrate in a particular area within Human Geography, while fulfilling the overall requirements given above. These are not POSt requirements, but rather suggestions for students seeking guidance on how to navigate our course offerings.

Cultural and Historical Geography: GGR216H1, GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR321H1, GGR336H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1, GGR360H1, GGR361H1, GGR382H1, GGR421H1, GGR439H1, GGR482H1JGI346H1; JUG320H1

Urban GeographyGGR112H1GGR124H1, GGR216H1, GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR246H1, GGR252H1, GGR254H1GGR336H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR340H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1, GGR357H1GGR358H1, GGR359H1, GGR360H1, GGR361H1GGR374H1, GGR381H1, GGR382H1, GGR424H1, GGR431H1, GGR433H1, GGR434H1, GGR457H1, GGR458H1, GGR482H1; JGI216H1, JGI346H1, JGI454H1

Social and Economic Geography: GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1, GGR216H1, GGR220H1, GGR221H1, GGR223H1, GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR246H1, GGR252H1, GGR254H1, GGR320H1, GGR323H1, GGR327H1, GGR328H1, GGR329H1, GGR336H1, GGR340H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1, GGR352H1, GGR356H1, GGR357H1, GGR358H1, GGR359H1, GGR360H1, GGR361H1, GGR363H1GGR374H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR421H1, GGR424H1, GGR431H1, GGR438H1, GGR439H1, GGR452H1, GGR482H1; JGE331H1; JGI216H1

Political Geography: GGR112H1, GGR124H1, GGR216H1, GGR221H1, GGR225H1, GGR241H1, GGR320H1, GGR321H1, GGR327H1, GGR328H1GGR339H1, GGR352H1, GGR358H1, GGR363H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR421H1, GGR438H1GGR439H1, GGR452H1, GGR457H1; JGE331H1; JGI216H1, JGI346H1; JUG320H1

Geography of Canada: GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR321H1, GGR336H1GGR339H1, GGR357H1, GGR374H1GGR457H1, GGR482H1; JGI346H1; JUG320H1

Environment: GGR107H1GGR223H1GGR240H1, GGR314H1, GGR321H1, GGR323H1, GGR329H1GGR334H1, GGR337H1, GGR338H1, GGR340H1, GGR341H1, GGGR343H1, GGR360H1, GGR381H1GGR416H1, GGR418H1, GGR419H1, GGR421H1, GGR434H1, GGR438H1, GGR462H1, GGR473H1; JFG470H1, JFG475H1; JGE321H1, JGE331H1; JUG320H1

Planning: GGR124H1, GGR216H1, GGR225H1GGR334H1, GGR336H1, GGR338H1, GGR339H1, GGR340H1, GGR343H1, GGR356H1, GGR357H1GGR359H1, GGR361H1, GGR374H1, GGR381H1, GGR382H1, GGR416H1, GGR424H1, GGR431H1, GGR433H1, GGR434H1, GGR457H1, GGR458H1, GGR482H1; JGI216H1, JGI346H1, JGI454H1

Physical and Environmental Geography Specialist (Science program)

Specialist Entry Requirements:

Admission will be determined by one of the following:

0.5 FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 77% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 70% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 6 half courses or the equivalent  GGR100H1; MAT123H1/MAT125H1, MAT124H1/MAT126H1, MAT133Y1/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1, MAT223H1/MAT240H1, MAT224H1/MAT247H1; PHY131H1/PHY151H1, PHY132H1/PHY152H1; CME119H1 (Faculty of Engineering); CHM138H1, CHM139H1, CHM151Y1; BIO120H1, BIO130H1, at least two of which must be Math or Phys half courses. 3.0
B: Any 4 GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, up to one half course from Group H (below) 2.0
C: Any 1 GGR101H1, GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1  0.5
D: All 4  GGR270H1, GGR272H1, GGR337H1, GGR390H1  2.0
E: Any 7 GGR273H1, GGR301H1, GGR303H1, GGR305H1, GGR307H1GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR373H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, GGR416H1JGE236H1, (but no more than one of GGR273H1, GGR373H1), FOR310H1; any GGR course from the list for requirement B and F not already used; up to three half courses from Group I (below)  3.5
F: Any 2 GGR403H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1, GGR491Y1, GGR498H1, 400-series in Group I, but the total number of half courses from Group I (including 300-series courses) must not exceed 3  1.0
Total   12.0

Physical and Environmental Geography Major (Science program)

Major Entry Requirements:

Admission will be determined by one of the following:

0.5 GGR FCE's at the 100 or 200 level with a final mark of 73% or 1.0 GGR FCE's at the 100 and/or 200 level with a final mark of 67% in each course.

Jointly-offered GGR courses will also be considered (e.g. JGI, JGE). This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. Achieving these marks does not necessarily guarantee admission to the program in any given year.

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 4 half courses or the equivalent  GGR100H1; MAT123H1/MAT125H1, MAT124H1/MAT126H1, MAT133Y1/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1, MAT223H1/MAT240H1, MAT224H1/MAT247H1; PHY131H1/PHY151H1, PHY132H1/PHY152H1; CME119H1 (Faculty of Engineering); CHM138H1, CHM139H1, CHM151Y1; BIO120H1, BIO130H1, at least two of which must be Math or Phys half courses. 2.0
B: Any 3 GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1 1.5
C: Any 1 GGR101H1, GGR240H1, GGR246H1, GGR254H1, GGR341H1, GGR342H1, GGR343H1 0.5
D: All 3  GGR270H1, GGR272H1GGR390H1  1.5
E: Any 4 GGR273H1, GGR301H1, GGR303H1, GGR305H1, GGR307H1, GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR337H1, GGR373H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, GGR416H1, JGE236H1, (but no more than one from GGR273H1, GGR373H1), FOR310H1; any GGR course from the list for requirement B or F not already used; any one half course from Group I (below) 2.0
F: Any 1 from GGR403H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1, GGR491Y1, GGR498H1 0.5
Total   8.0

Physical & Environmental Geography Minor (Science program)

Minor Entry Requirements: There are no entry requirements for this program

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any 2 GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1GGR124H1  1.0
B: Any 2 GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1  1.0
C: 3 GGR390H1; (GGR301H1/GGR303H1/GGR305H1); (GGR272H1/GGR337H1/GGR308H1) 1.5
NEWD: Any 1  A half course from GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR301H1, GGR303H1, GGR305H1, GGR307H1, GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR333H1, GGR347H1, GGR348H1, GGR403H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1; FOR310H1; JGE236H1 0.5
Total   4.0

 


Physical & Environmental Geography Groups

Group H: Faculty of Arts & Science courses
CHM217H1, CHM310H1; ESS221H1, ESS261H1; GLG216H1; PHY251H1, PHY255H1. Faculty of Engineering courses: CHE210H1; EDV250H1

NEWGroup I
EEB301H1, EEB302H1, EEB303H1, EEB304H1, EEB305H1, EEB310H1, EEB311H1, EEB319H1, EEB321H1, EEB324H1, EEB328H1, EEB330H1, EEB428H1; ENV346H1; ESS311H1, ESS461H1; FOR301H1, FOR305H1, FOR306H1, FOR417H1; JEE337H1; PHY392H1, PHY408H1

Course Clusters

Students may wish to choose courses from among one or more of the following clusters if they wish to concentrate in a particular area within Physical & Environmental Geography (Science). These are not POSt requirements, but rather suggestions for students seeking guidance on how to navigate our course offerings.

Climate System and Climatic Change: GGR203H1, GGR303H1, GGR314H1, GGR403H1, ENV346H1

Land Surface Processes: GGR100H1, GGR201H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR301H1, GGR305H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1

Environmental Physical Geography: GGR101H1, GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR301H1, GGR308H1, GGR314H1, GGR405H1, GGR409H1, GGR413H1

Students contemplating graduate studies are strongly urged to combine their Physical & Environmental Geography Major or Specialist with a Minor in Mathematics (involving calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations) and a Minor in a field of science related to their particular interests in physical geography (biology, chemistry, geology, or physics).

Groups H and I list courses from outside the Geography Department that can be applied to the requirements for the Physical and Environmental Geography Major (one course only) or the Specialist (up to 3 courses only); these courses are an option only for students that have the required pre-requisites.

Geographic Information Systems Minor (Arts program)

Note: Students combining this program with a Specialist/Major sponsored by the Department of Geography will normally be allowed to count only 1.5 (of the 4.0) FCEs towards both programs.

Minor Entry Requirements: There are no entry requirements for this program

Number of courses  Courses FCEs
A: Any 2 half courses  GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1GGR124H1 (or 1.0 other GGR courses with the permission of the Department)  1.0
B: All 4  GGR270H1, GGR272H1, GGR273H1, GGR373H1  2.0
C: Any 2 half courses GGR225H1, GGR337H1, GGR413H1, GGR462H1, GGR473H1, GGR491Y1, GGR492H1, GGR497H1, GGR498H1, GGR499H1, JFG470H1, JFG475H1 1.0
Note: At least 1.0 FCE must be 300/400 series courses    
 Total   4.0 

 

Asian Geographies (offered jointly with the National University of Singapore) Minor

This Type 3 minor program represents a unique opportunity to study geography in a different cultural environment. For more information, contact the Undergraduate Office and the Centre for International Experience (CIE, www.cie.utoronto.ca). Students are advised to contact the U of T Geography Department in advance of going abroad to discuss course selection at NUS.

Number of courses Courses FCEs
A: Any half course: GGR100H1, GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1 0.5
B: Any 3 half courses (U of T): Other higher level GGR/JGE/JGI/JFG/JUG courses 1.5
C: Any 4 half courses (NUS): NUS250H0, NUS251H0, NUS252H0, NUS253H0, NUS254H0, NUS255H0, NUS256H0, NUS350H0, NUS351Y0, NUS352H0, NUS353H0, NUS354H0 (or other NUS course with permission of the department) 2.0

Note: At least 1.0 FCEs must be at the 300/400 level (from U of T or NUS)

   
Total   4.0

Geography Courses


Prerequisites

NOTE

Recommended Preparation: The course will be taught in a manner that assumes students have achieved the level of study (e.g., third year standing) and completed courses listed (or equivalent background).

Prerequisites: These are strictly monitored requirements. In some cases Prerequisites may be waived if equivalent background exists. Please consult the Associate Chair, Undergraduate or the course instructor.


First-Year Seminars

The 199Y1 and 199H1 seminars are designed to provide the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a class of no more than twenty-four students. These interactive seminars are intended to stimulate the students’ curiosity and provide an opportunity to get to know a member of the professorial staff in a seminar environment during the first year of study. Details can be found at www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/fyh-1/.


GGR100H1    Introduction to Physical Geography[24L/4P]

Introduction to Physical Geography using an Earth systems approach. We examine the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere, emphasizing processes, energy flows, cycles and scale. Specific topics include weather and climate, geomorphic processes and the genesis of landforms, river systems, glaciers, soils, and biomes. Laboratory sessions and a field trip provide practical experience with the lecture topics.

Exclusion: GGR100Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR101H1    Ancient Civilizations and their Environments[24L]

The course will focus on the processes that drive environmental change and how past societies have responded to the constraints that these impose. The emphasis is on the current interglacial, the Holocene, and how increasing population and technology has affected human-environment interactions.

Exclusion: JGE236H1(taken in 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR107H1    Environment, Food and People[24L/5T]

Examines the relations between food, nature, and society. Food is fundamental to human existence, and central to most cultures; it also has significant and widespread effects on the physical environment. This course uses food as a lens to explore human-environment interactions locally and globally. It serves as an introduction to environmental geography.

Exclusion: GGR107Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR112H1    Geographies of Globalization, Development and Inequality[24L/8T]

Economic development and underdevelopment are taking shape in an increasingly interconnected global context. This course examines geographic approaches to "Third World" development, economic globalization, poverty, and inequality. It pays particular attention to the roles of rural-urban and international migration in shaping specific landscapes of development.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR124H1    Urbanization, Contemporary Cities and Urban Life[24L/6T]

Offers an introduction to North American cities and urbanization in a global context. It explores social, cultural, political and economic forces, processes, and events that shape contemporary urbanism. The course adopts the lens of 'fixity' and 'flow' to examine how the movement of people, ideas, goods, and capital, as well as their containment in the infrastructure and space of the city, give rise to particular urban forms.

Exclusion: GGR124Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR201H1    Geomorphology[24L/4P]

Introduction to the principles of geomorphology; earth materials; major features of crustal morphology; landforming processes of water, wind, waves and ice; human impact on earth surface processes. One hour laboratory session approximately every other week; a local field trip.

Recommended Preparation: GGR100H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR203H1    Introduction to Climatology[34L]

Introduction to the large scale processes responsible for determining global and regional climate and atmospheric circulation patterns, as well as the small scale processes responsible for determining the microclimates of specific environments.

Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Recommended Preparation: GGR100H1; MAT123H1/125H1, 124H1/126H1, 133Y1/135Y1/137Y1/157Y1; PHY131H1/151H1, 132H1/152H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR205H1    Introduction to Soil Science[24L/4P]

Introduction to soil science dealing with the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils; soil formation and development; the classification of soils, and the application of soil science to environmental, agricultural and forestry issues.

Recommended Preparation: CHM137Y1/(138H1, 139H1); GGR100H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR206H1    Introduction to Hydrology[30L/4T]

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on the physical processes, including precipitation, interception, evaporation, runoff, ground water and soil water. Basic hydrological models will be practiced.

Recommended Preparation: GGR100H1; MAT135H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR216H1    Global Cities[24L]

Most urban courses taught in the English-speaking world implicitly or explicitly focus on large North American, European, or Australian cities.  While these places are interesting in their own right, studying them as the sole model of urbanization is misleading.  To a great extent, the societies of the westernized, developed world are already highly-urbanized and have been so for decades.  Cities outside of this sphere, by contrast, are generally growing much faster, and experiencing greater social and economic upheaval as a result.  Understanding non-North American urbanization is a vital part of understanding cities in general.  This course is an attempt to introduce students to processes of urbanization that are occurring in places other than North America.   There will be a particular focus on comparing the urban form, economies, and social life in cities around the world.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGI216H1    Globalization and Urban Change [24L]

Focusing on the impacts that global flows of ideas, culture, people, goods, and capital have on cities throughout the globe, this course explores some of the factors that differentiate the experiences of globalization and urban change in cities at different moments in history and in various geographic locations.

Recommended Preparation: GGR124H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR220H1    The Spatial Organization of Economic Activity[24L/2T]

Focuses on theoretical and empirical topics aimed at describing, analyzing and explaining the spatial distribution of economic activity at macro- and micro-spatial-scales. Topics covered could include theories of regional economic growth and change, issues surrounding uneven development in space, the empirical definition of regional economic systems, and the measurement of economic growth and structural change.

Exclusion: GGR220Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR221H1    New Economic Spaces[24L]

Provides an introduction to economic geography and economic geography theory from the 1970s on, illustrating the different ways that geographers have conceptualized the restructuring of resource industries, manufacturing and services. The crisis of Fordism and the rise of new production models will be given particular attention, along with the reorganization of finance, the rise of cultural industries and the globalization of commodity chains. New regimes of governance of the economy will also be considered.

Exclusion: GGR220Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR223H1    Environment, Society and Resources (formerly GGR222H1)[24L/6T]

Focuses on society-environment relations and different approaches to resource governance and management. This includes exploration of the spatial, social, and political economic origins and implications of humans' changing relations to nature. Drawing on debates from environmental governance and political ecology literatures, the course also investigates the ways that different actors and institutions have framed and sought solutions to environmental and resource challenges.

Exclusion: GGR222H1/GGR222Y1/GGR233Y1/JGE221Y1/ENV222Y1/ENV222H1 (if ENV222H1 was taken before 2012-13)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR225H1    Power of Maps and Geographic Information[24L/4P]

Examines the changing role of geographic information in society.  Considers how spatial information is produced, organized, controlled, and used in different historical, cultural and political contexts. Topics examined include: the effects of the shift from print to digital mapping; implications of mobile spatial technologies and the geoweb; open source and open access; production and control of spatial data and information; and alternative cartographies.  Introduces geospatial literacy skills.

Exclusion: GGR375H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR240H1    Historical Geography of North America[24L/2T]

Introduction to the historical geography of North America from the pre-Columbian period to the 20th century. Topics include European imperialism, staple economies, settler colonialism, railroads and the West, industrialization and urbanization, modernism and modernization, and enduring struggles over land.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR241H1    Historical Geographies of Urban Exclusion and Segregation[24L]

An introduction to the historical geographies of urban social exclusion and segregation between 1750 and 1950. Using a selection of cities from around the world (such as Glasgow, Moscow, Paris, New Delhi, Pittsburgh, Mumbai and Nairobi), the course examines the impacts and implications of urban social inequalities.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR246H1    Geography of Canada[24L]

Social and economic differences have been, and continue to be, a prominent feature of Canada’s geography. In this course these differences are examined at a regional and local scale. The course adopts a thematic approach and considers issues such as historical development, urbanization, industrialization, immigration and population change, Canada’s cultural mosaic and native issues. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of social and economic policies and Canada’s incorporation into a global economy.

Recommended Preparation: GGR107H1, GGR124H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR252H1    Marketing Geography[24L/4T]

The problem of retail location. The spatial structure of consumer demand and retail facilities. Shopping centres and retail chains. Techniques for site selection and trade area evaluation, location strategies, retail planning.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR254H1    Geography USA[24L]

After a short historical overview of the making of America, this course focuses on contemporary issues in American society, economy, politics, race, regional distinctions and disparities, urban development.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR270H1    Introductory Analytical Methods[36L/12T]

Theory and practical application of elementary quantitative techniques in geography emphasizing descriptive, inferential and spatial statistical analysis, probability, and sampling.

Exclusion: ECO220Y1/ECO227Y1/GGR270Y1/LIN305H1/PSY201H1/SOC202H1/SOC200Y1/STA220H1/POL242Y1/STA250H1/ STA248H1/STA261H1
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in Geography
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR271H1    Social Research Methods[24L]

Practical course on field methods designed to enable students to carry out their own research projects. Behavioural observation, interviewing, questionnaire design, sampling theory, content analysis of written and graphic material, data coding and focus groups.

Exclusion: SOC200H1/SOC204H1/WDW350H1/ENV223H1(from 2010-11)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR272H1    Geographic Information and Mapping I[24L/24P]

Introduction to digital mapping and spatial analysis using geographic information systems (GIS). Students learn how to use GIS software to find, edit, analyze and map geographic data to create their own maps, analyze geographic problems and use techniques that can be applied to a variety of subject areas.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR273H1    Geographic Information and Mapping II[24L/24P]

Builds on GGR272H1 by providing students with practical spatial analysis methods and the underlying theory needed to understand how to approach various geographic problems using geographic information system (GIS) software and a variety of data types and sources.

For the section available online: This online course will use web-based delivery of lectures and tutorials and utilize a range of communication tools. The final exam in April will require student attendance on the St. George campus.

Prerequisite: GGR272H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR299Y1    Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR300H1    Special Topics in Geography I[24L]

Content in any given year depends on instructor. The program in which the course can be used depends on its content. Consult Department Office in April.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR301H1    Fluvial Geomorphology[24L/4P]

Elements of drainage basin morphology and hydrology, classification of rivers, stream patterns and hydraulic geometry. Elements of open channel flow, sediment transport and the paleohydrology of river systems. River channel adjustments to environmental change, human impact and the management/design of river habitats. Exercises include experimentation in a laboratory flume.

Prerequisite: GGR270H1 (or equivalent)
Recommended Preparation: 10.0 FCE's including GGR100H1 or GGR201H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR303H1    Climate-Biosphere Interactions[24L]

Discussion of the exchange of energy and matter (carbon, water) between the Earths biosphere (terrestrial vegetation) and atmosphere, with a focus on processes underlying key feedbacks on regional climate. Examples will be taken from research on contemporary as well as paleoclimate systems. Case studies to include how human disturbances like land-use change or future climate change may alter these processes.  

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCE`s
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE`s from PHY131H1/PHY132H1/CHM138H1/CHM139H1/MAT135H1/MAT136H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR305H1    Biogeography[24L]

Identifies patterns in and explains processes behind plant and animal distributions through space and time. Topics covered include ecological and evolutionary dynamics, disturbance, dispersal, migration, continental drift, speciation, extinction, paleoenvironments and island biogeography. We also examine terrestrial and marine biomes, the meaning of biodiversity, conservation challenges, and recent biogeographic changes associated with human impact.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR100H1 or (BIO120H1, BIO130H1)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR307H1    Soil and Water: Landscape Processes[24L/10P]

An introduction to physical and chemical processes operating at micro- to landscape scales and their effects on soil and water quality. Discussion of anthropogenic impacts and management and conservation issues. Local and international case studies.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR205H1 and GGR206H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR308H1    Physical Aspects of the Canadian Arctic and Subarctic[24L]

We will explore the climate geomorphology, soils, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, limnology and food web structures of the Arctic and Subarctic. Current stresses of climate change and pollution are discussed along with scientific and political solutions.

Prerequisite: Equivalent of one full-year science course at the 200-level or permission from the instructor.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR314H1    Global Warming[26L/9T]

A comprehensive examination of the greenhouse warming problem, beginning with economic, carbon cycle, and climate model projections; impacts on and adaptive responses of agriculture, forests, fisheries, and water resources; abatement options; technical and institutional issues.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR320H1    Geographies of Transnationalism, Migration, and Gender[24L]

This course examines recent changes in global migration processes. Specifically, the course addresses the transnationalization and feminization of migrant populations and various segments of the global labor force. The coursework focuses on analyzing classical paradigms in migration studies, as well as emerging theoretical approaches to gender and migration. In addition, it traces the shifting empirical trends in gendered employment and mobility patterns. It uses in-depth case study material to query the frameworks employed in migration studies and to understand the grounded implications of gendered migration. It pays particular attention to the interventions made by feminist geographers in debates about work, migration, place, and space.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JUG320H1    The Canadian Wilderness [24L]

The idea of wilderness permeates narratives of Canadian national identity, while policy-makers seek to manage and contain natural areas. This course compares and contrasts historical and contemporary wilderness narratives in literature, painting and film with policies in areas such as conservation, urban planning, land claims and tourism.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

GGR321H1    Aboriginal People and Environmental Issues in Canada (formerly JAG321H1)[24L]

Indigenous views of environment, resource management and governance from pre-European contact times through to the present will be explored in this course. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging role of Indigenous peoples in environmental and resource management in Canada. Topics to be covered include: history of Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal relations, Aboriginal and treaty rights, Aboriginal world view and philosophy, traditional knowledge, Aboriginal environmental ethics and principles and current environmental issues confronting Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Exclusion: JAG321H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography and/or Aboriginal Studies (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGE321H1    Multicultural Perspectives on Environmental Management [24L]

Diverse approaches to environmental issues from a variety of multicultural perspectives are introduced, compared and analyzed, using case studies. Perspectives on environmental management will be discussed as they emerge from contexts such as Latin America, Asia, or Africa.

Prerequisite: ENV221H1/ENV222H1/GGR222H1/GGR223H1
Exclusion: ENV321Y1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR323H1    Issues in Population Geography[24L]

Explores issues in the geographies of population at a variety of scales from global to local. Topics include an investigation of the mechanics of population growth, theories of population, population growth through time, migration, the impact of population growth on the environment and the social and economic consequences of population change.

Exclusion: GGR208H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR107H1, GGR124H1, GGR246H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR326H1    Remaking the Global Economy[24L]

Examines links between global economic integration and geographically uneven economic development. Focuses on debates and empirical studies on global production networks (GPNs), and associated issues such as offshoring, outsourcing, and upgrading. Blends analysis of both theory and practice of business firms and regional development. Seeks to develop an in-depth understanding of the key actors driving contemporary global economic transformation, within the 'transnational space' constituted and structured by transnational firns, state institutions, and ideologies.

Prerequisite: 7.5 FCE's
Exclusion: GGR300H1 (2013-14)
Recommended Preparation: GGR112H1/GGR220H1/GGR221H1, 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3) at the 200+ level
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR327H1    Geography and Gender[24L]

Introduction to the work of feminist geographers. The course will explore the relationship between gender and space, emphasizing spatial cognition, architecture, and layout of the city.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR328H1    Labour Geographies[24L]

Explores changes in the nature of work and the structure and geography of labour markets. Topics will include globalization, lean production, flexibility and risk, industrial relations, workfare, the body at work, and gender and work.

Prerequisite: 7.5 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR329H1    The Global Food System[24L]

Explores the changing global geographies of food by tracing international movements of food through both mainstream and 'alternative' supply chains. The implications for sustainability, food security, community autonomy and health are investigated.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGE331H1    Resource and Environmental Theory (formerly GGR331H1) [24L]

Introduction to and critical evaluation of major ideas and conceptual traditions underpinning environmental and natural resource politics and regulation. Topics include: parks and protectred areas, market-based environmental regulation, property rights and conservation, Malthusianism, and biodiversity conservation. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of primary texts.

Prerequisite: GGR100H1/GGR107H1/ENV221H1/ENV222H1/GGR222H1/GGR223H1
Exclusion: GGR331H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR333H1    Energy Supply and Use[24L/7T]

Examines the technical options and costs of achieving significant reductions in the energy demands of new buildings through better design and in the energy use of existing buildings through retrofits, and of the possibilities of sustainably supplying the reduced energy demands through wind and solar energy.

Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Exclusion: GGR347H1/JGE347H1, GGR348H1/JGE348H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including first year Math and/or Physics
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR334H1    Water Resource Management[24L]

Managing demand and supply; linkages between water quality and human health. Case studies from the industrial world and from developing countries, rural and urban. Implications of population growth and climate change for water resource management.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of GGR100H1, GGR107H1, GGR223H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR336H1    Urban Historical Geography of North America[24L]

This course explores the emergence and reproduction of class and racial social spaces, the development of new economic spaces, and the growing importance of the reform and planning movements. Emphasis is on metropolitan development between 1850 and 1950.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of GGR124H1, GGR241H1, GGR254H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR337H1    Environmental Remote Sensing[24L/24P]

Principles of optical, active and passive microwave remote sensing; satellite orbit and sensor characteristics; image processing and analysis techniques and software; and environmental remote sensing principles.

Recommended Preparation: GGR100H1, GGR272H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR338H1    Environmental Problems in Developing Countries[24L]

Describes and analyses a broad range of the key environmental issues currently facing developing countries from geographical perspectives. Emphasis is on air pollution, water contamination and treatment, residential and industrial solid waste collection and management, with multimedia and written examples drawn from throughout the developing world.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of GGR107H1, GGR223H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR339H1    Urban Geography, Planning and Political Processes[24L]

Investigates North American urban political geography, exploring conflicts over immigration, environment, gentrification, homelessness, labour market restructuring, ‘race’ and racism, urban sprawl, nature and environment, gender, sexuality, security, and segregation. Explores competing visions of city life and claims on urban space. The course investigates how these struggles connect to economic, social and environmental politics at larger spatial scales, and considers different theoretical frameworks that geographers have developed to make sense of both the persistence of old problems and the emergence of new ones.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1, GGR246H1/GGR254H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR340H1    Health Geography [24L]

An exploration of the aspects of health in which place or location matters. Particular attention will be paid to the role of environments (physical, social, etc.) in explaining differences in health between places, the structuring of health-related behaviour in place, and the development of health policy for places.

Prerequisite: 2 of GGR270H1, GGR271H1 or GGR272H1
Exclusion: GGR330H1, GGR450H1, GGR451H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of GGR222H1/GGR223H1 or ENV236H1/JGE236H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR341H1    Changing Geography of Latin America[24L]

Seeks to develop a general understanding of present-day Latin America by focusing on human-environment interactions, past and present. Case studies are used to understand the diversity of Latin American landscapes (physical and cultural), and how they are changing within the context of globalization.

Exclusion: GGR249H
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR342H1    The Changing Geography of Southeast Asia[24L]

Examines changes in the social, political and economic geography of Southeast Asian countries. Examples drawn from Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines as these emerging newly industrialized countries enter the 21st century. Emphasis on political-economy, urbanization and environment since 1950.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR343H1    The Changing Geography of China[36L]

The evolving social, political and economic landscape of China. Focus on development strategies and their effects on agriculture, industry, urbanization, city planning and the environment since 1949. Special attention paid to the interconnected development trajectories shaping urban and rural areas, together with the complex interactions between the built and social environments.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGI346H1    The Urban Planning Process [24L]

Overview of how planning tools and practice shape the built form of cities. This course introduces twentieth century physical planning within its historical, social, legal, and political contexts. Community and urban design issues are addressed at local and regional scales and in both central cities and suburbs. The focus is on Toronto and the Canadian experience, with comparative examples form the other counties, primarily the United States.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1, INI235Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR347H1    Efficient Use of Energy (formerly JGE347H1)[24L/6T]

Examines the options available for dramatically reducing our use of primary energy with no reduction in meaningful energy services, through more efficient use of energy at the scale of energy-using devices and of entire energy systems. Topics covered include energy use in buildings, transportation, industry, and agriculture.

Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Exclusion: GGR333H1, JGE347H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including first year Math and/or Physics
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR348H1    Carbon-Free Energy (formerly JGE348H1)[24L/6T]

Examines the options available for providing energy from carbon-free energy sources: solar, wind, biomass, nuclear, and fossil fuels with capture and sequestration of CO2. The hydrogen economy is also discussed.

Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Exclusion: GGR333H1, JGE348H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including first year Math and/or Physics
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR352H1    Understanding Spatiality[24L]

Investigates the changing nature of space and our thinking about it, introducing students to a wide range of contemporary geographers and spatial theorists such as Lefebvre, Soja, Gregory, Harvey, Massey and others as well as challenges to this thinking - voices from the margins or peripheries. It will explore changing conceptions of spatiality that inform geographic thought and that help us understand the ways in which political, economic and social power is constituted and contested at a range of spatial scales.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR356H1    Recreation and Tourism [24L]

Explores recreation, tourism and leisure from local and global perspectives, including the social and environmental costs and benefits. Connects tourism and recreation to core geographical concepts related to globalization, mobility, planning, construction of place and identity, landscapes of consumption, and the environment.

Exclusion: GGR256H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR107H1, GGR124H1, GGR221H1, GGR246H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR357H1    Housing and Community Development[24L]

Focuses on the importance of adequate housing and quality neighbourhoods. It roots theoretical explanations and policy debates in realities using Canada and Toronto as examples. Topics covered include the evolution of public policies relating to social housing, rental housing, homeownership, neighborhoods, and homelessness.

Recommended Preparation: Completion of 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1 and 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR359H1    Comparative Urban Policy[24L]

A comparative survey of urban policy approaches around the world.  Emphasizes the geographic dimensions of policy challenges in cities, which present a unique set of spatial constraints and opportunities.  Considers themes of scale, policy transfer and justifications for urban planning interventions through policy case studies and international comparisons.

Prerequisite: 7.5 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR360H1    Culture, History, and Landscape[24L]

The history of approaches to the idea of landscape. A consideration of the origins and uses of the term in geographical inquiry will be followed by a series of case studies, global in scope, from the Early Modern period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the representational and lived aspects of landscapes, as well as struggles over their definition, interpretation, and use.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (HUM/BR=1 or SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GGR361H1    Understanding the Urban Landscape[24L]

Three related themes are discussed: the underlying social, cultural and economic forces that have given cities their form and image; various aesthetic and political philosophies that have been put into practice in constructing the urban landscape; and recent European and North American attempts to control the landscape of the contemporary metropolis by the application of urban policy and planning.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1 and one of GGR216H1, JGI216H1, GGR240H1, or GGR246H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR363H1    Critical Geographies: An Introduction to Radical Ideas on Space, Society and Culture[36L]

Introduces a diversity of critical perspectives for geographers and others, including anarchism, Marxism, feminism, sexual politics, postcolonialism, anti-imperialism and anti-racism. In so doing it illustrates how such radical ideas about space, society and culture have contributed to our political thought and action.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR373H1    Advanced Geographic Information Systems[24L/24P]

Advanced theory, techniques, and applications in geographic information systems (GIS), including interpolation, geostatistics, modeling, and raster and vector analysis. GIS project design and implementation.

Prerequisite: GGR273H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR374H1    Urban Dynamics[24L]

Problems and issues relating to the formation of polynuclear urban regions and the relationship between changing urban forms and the evolution of global, national, regional and local innovation systems, economic structural change, social polarization, culture-led revitalization, gentrification, and a host of related topics will represent the foci of this course. Specific topics may vary year to year, but all iterations of this course will emphasize the quantitative approach to the analysis of urban growth and change.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 2.0 FCE's in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3). A statistics course (GGR270H1 or other) would be an asset.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR381H1    Field Course in Environmental Geography[TBA]

Introduction to field studies in environmental geography. The course may include individual assignments and group work. Field trips are concentrated during a one-week period in late August or early September. Some preparation during the preceding summer may be required. Periodic course meetings and shorter field trips continue, along with course work, during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation. Students must register with the Department by April. Course may be limited by size. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 3.0 FCE's in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR382H1    Field Course in Human Geography[TBA]

Introduction to field studies in human geography. The course includes exercises and a project during a one-week field study in late August or early September, some preparation during the preceding summer and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation. Students must register with the Department by April. Course is limited by size. Preference given to Geography SPE/MAJ/MIN. Applications open to all students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR390H1    Field Methods[TBA]

Introduction to field methods in vegetation mapping/analysis, soils, hydrology, climatology and geomorphology. The course includes exercises and a project during a one-week field camp, a little preparation during the preceding summer, and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation. This course meets the field requirement for Physical & Environmental Geography programs. The field camp normally runs at the end of August/early September. Students must register with the Department by April. Consult with the department in case of conflict or concerns. Course may be limited by size. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: GGR100H1 and 1.0 from GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR305H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR398H0    Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/399. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR399Y0    Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/399. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR400H1    Special Topics in Geography I [TBA]

Content in any given year depends on instructor. The program in which this course can be used depends on its context. Consult Departmental Office in April.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE's in GGR (HUM/BR=1 or SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: TBA

GGR401H1    Special Topics in Geography II[TBA]

Content in any given year depends on instructor. The program in which this course can be used depends on its context. Consult Departmental Office in April.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE's (science) in any of GGR/ESS/BIO/CHM/EEB/FOR
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: TBA

GGR403H1    Global Ecology and Biogeochemical Cycles[24L]

Content in any given year depends on instructor. The program in which this course can be used depends on its context. Consult Departmental Office in April. Seminar course on biogeochemical cycling of carbon, water, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and iron between the Earths atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere. Examples and case studies will be taken from research on contemporary as well as paleoclimate systems.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE's (science) in any of GGR/ESS/PHY/CHM/MAT/EEB
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR405H1    Sustainable Systems for Natural Resources Management[24S]

This seminar examines the scientific foundations of sustainable natural resource management. Will consider frameworks to assess management and production systems for renewable natural resource and energy development in relation to specific landscapes. Constraints and opportunities to achieving sustainability objectives in different systems will be examined through theoretical and case study evaluations drawn from research literatures.  Seminar and self-directed inquiry through individual and team projects. 

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Exclusion: GGR401H1 (2012-13)
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE's (science) in any of GGR/BIO/CHM/EEB/ESS/FOR
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR409H1    Contaminants in the Environment[24L/11T]

Are we experiencing a subclinical epidemic of subtle health effects due to chemical contaminants in our bodies? The environmental behaviour and toxicology of inorganic and organic chemical contaminants is discussed in order to understand the scientific basis of this question and to answer this question. Facility is gained with simple and complex mathematical models. The interface between science and policy is discussed throughout.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including CHM137Y1/(CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/CHM151Y1/GGR205H1, First-year Math
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR413H1    Watershed Hydroecology[24L]

Modern developments in hydrology and ecology, including form and process models, interactions of hydrology, ecology and geomorphology; the course emphasizes use of computer simulation models of drainage basin processes.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: GGR201H1, GGR206H1, GGR270H1, GGR272H1 or GGR337H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR416H1    Environmental Impact Assessment (formerly GGR393H1)[24L/4T]

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) as a mechanism for avoiding or mediating the potential costs of development. The course focuses on the theory and practice of EIA in Canada in general and Ontario in particular. Using a broad definition of environment, various components of EIA are addressed, with an emphasis on principles, legal and institutional frameworks, stages in the process, and specific analytical techniques.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's, 2.0 FCE's in Geography including GGR270H1, GGR271H1
Exclusion: GGR393H1
Recommended Preparation: One of GGR222H1/GGR223H1 or ENV236H1/JGE236H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR418H1    Political Economy of Natural Resources[24S]

Examines political aspects of the appropriation of natural resources, including policy and regulation, environmental impacts, and social justice. Emphasis is placed on reading contemporary literature on the politics of resource access and control from geography and other social science disciplines.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including GGR223H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR419H1    Environmental Justice[24S]

Examines how environmental problems affect people, communities and societies differentially and how marginalized communities and people often bear the brunt of environmental costs, while contributing little to their creation.  It uses readings and case studies from across the globe to address the production of environmental injustice and the struggle for environmental justice.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR421H1    History & Philosophy of Geography[24S]

The history of geography as an intellectual subject, focusing primarily on the modern period, and on the genealogies of central concepts such as region, landscape, and place. Disciplinary developments will be situated next to broader contexts, including imperialism and militarism, the relationship between culture and nature, and the shifting social role of the academy.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE's in Geography (HUM/BR=1 or SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR424H1    Transportation Geography and Planning (formerly GGR324H1)[24L]

Introductory overview of major issues in interurban and intraurban transportation at the local, national and international scale. Topics include urban transportation, land use patterns and the environment, causes of and cures for congestion, public transit, infrastructure finance, and transport planning and policy setting.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including one of GGR124H1/GGR220H1/GGR221H1
Exclusion: GGR324H1
Recommended Preparation: GGR270H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR430H1    Geographies of Markets[36S]

Focuses on actually-existing markets and their geographically-mediated formation and assemblage. Explores how markets are produced, stabilized, reshaped and fall apart at multiple geographic scales. We examine issues such as the debates on states versus markets, embeddedness of markets, neoliberalism and moral justification of markets, varieties of capitalism, regionally variegated capitalism, post-socialist market transitions, and the dynamic evolution of market institutions and economic landscapes.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including at least 1.0 FCE in 300+ Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Exclusion: GGR400H1(2013-14)
Recommended Preparation: GGR220H1/GGR221H1, GGR326H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR431H1    Regional Dynamics[24L]

Theory and analysis of regional economic change with emphasis on North America and Western Europe. Export-base, neoclassical, increasing returns, and political-economic explanations of regional growth and decline, globalization, knowledge-based economy and the role of regions. Geography of technological change, labour-markets and labour relations. Objectives and approaches for local and regional development policy, including talent-based strategies for enhancing local creativity.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: GGR221H1, GGR270H1. A statistics course (GGR270H1 or other) would be an asset.
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR433H1    Built Environment and Health[36S]

Linking across fields that include public health, geography and planning, this course examines the growing evidence and ways in which human health is affected by the design and development of the built environment in which we live, work and play. The course considers how various planning and development decisions impact population and individual health, particularly in relation to chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Exclusion: GGR400H1 (2012-13)
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR434H1    Building Community Resilience[36S]

Examines concepts of resilience as a way of building the capacity of communities to (a) respond to predicted disruptions/shocks associated with climate change, global pandemics, anticipated disruptions in global food supply, energy insecurity, and environmental degradation; and (b) nurture the development of alternative spaces that support the emergence of more life-sustaining structures and practices. Includes explicit attention to equity and public health, and explores issues such as: participatory governance of social-ecological systems, the nature of social change, complexity science, the role of social movements, indigenous and political ecology perspectives.

Prerequisite: 10 FCEs
Exclusion: GGR400H1 (2011-12)
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCEs in Geography
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR438H1    Environment and Development[36S]

Examines the implications of development – as an economic and social project – for how the environment is used, by whom, and to what ends. Draws on literatures in political ecology and critical development geography. Topics include: interpretations of scarcity and degradation, questions of consumption, the greening of development, and formation of social movements and participatory initiatives at the interface of development and the environment.

Prerequisite: 10 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR439H1    Global Political Geography[36S]

Introduction to geopolitical theories. Emphasis on the development of the nation state, theories of land claims and the territorial manifestations of nationalism. Will examine recent theoretical as well as empirical challenges to many of the conventional geopolitical assumptions about scale, space, and power in global politics. Please note that this course is open to students who have taken GGR239H1 (formerly Global Political Geography).

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR452H1    Space, Power, Geography: Understanding Spatiality[24S]

Our understanding of space and power has shifted radically in the past half century. Space no longer implies only regions, nations or territory; power is not simply a question of domination, control, or forms of political representation. Space and power are intricately related. This course explores a shift in our ways of thinking about space and power, focusing specifically on the works of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze. Through the works of Deleuze and Foucault, students are introduced to a variety of ways that space and power are organized and contested. The course begins with the maps in our heads: what kinds of spatial systems organize dominant world-views, how have these changed over time? What spatial metaphors do we use to think about power – as hidden and operating at a depth, or as a surface effect? How does the social organization of space figure in the development of different technologies and techniques of power? How do technologies of power become organized, serialized, dispersed, transformed and contested?

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including at least one (or an equivalent) of GGR327H1, GGR328H1, GGR339H1, GGR352H1, GGR360H1, GGR363H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGI454H1    The Role of the Planner: Making a Difference [24L]

Focuses on the role of a planning practitioner in contemporary society using a wealth of examples drawn from recent issues and debates in Canadian cities and regions. The course will walk students through the demands made of planners in terms of both technical expertise as well as political necessity and ask them to think actively about how to prepare for the extraordinary growth of cities during the next century. Examples of issues that will be discussed in some detail include the myths surrounding the city vs. the suburbs, the creativity and passion involved in planning work and the need to see Toronto’s future from a regional perspective.

Prerequisite: 14.5 FCEs, 5.0 of which must be GGR/INI Urban Studies
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR457H1    The Post-War Suburbs[24L]

Investigates post-war suburbs, beginning with an examination of their competing contemporary meanings. It considers images of prosperous private enclaves, of declining and difficult to access places, of racialized and segregated areas, of banality and homogeneity, of precarity and polarization, and of creative social struggles. It assesses these different visions through an analysis of urban growth and change since WWII. The course will focus on themes of public and private space; class, race and segregation; gender and suburban space; immigration; urban sprawl, and the changing social and economic geography of the suburbs. It examines North American areas, with examples from Australia and Europe.

Prerequisite: 10 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR458H1    Advanced Topics in Urban Geography[24L]

This course focuses on original works that have been influential to the field of urban geography.  The first third of the course consists of extensive reading and discussion of pre-selected “classical” urban pieces.  The second third consists of student-led reviews of important urban books.  The final third consists of student-led projects devoted to a particular theme (announced on the first day of class).  It is designed for students who have taken urban courses in the past who are interested in extending this interest in a non-textbook, more interactive environment.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE`s
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR462H1    GIS Research Project

Students work in groups to develop their own research project and then acquire, organize and analyze geographic data to complete it. Emphasis is placed on research design, project management and the application of GIS concepts and skills learned in previous courses to a practical problem.

Prerequisite: GGR373H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science or Science course
Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

JFG470H1    Forest Management[24L]

Application of operational research and information technology to develop decision support systems for forest land management planning. Basic principles of mathematical programming, simulation and decision analysis, and their application to planning for forest conservation and sustainable development, policy analysis and other land management planning problems.

Prerequisite: One course in quantitative methods or linear algebra
Recommended Preparation: ECO220Y1/ECO227Y1/GGR270H1/MAT133Y1/MAT223H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR473H1    Cartographic Design[12L/24P]

Design and production of maps using GIS cartographic and graphics software packages. Map perception and map use, principles and elements of cartographic design, data acquisition and manipulation, production and reproduction of maps and atlases. Practical exercises culminate in a major project in thematic map design.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including GGR272H1, GGR273H1, 373H1
Exclusion: GGR380H5
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

JFG475H1    Forest Fire Management Systems [24L]

Use of operational research and information technology to develop mathematical models and decision support systems to design and evaluate the performance of forest fire and other emergency response systems. Forest fire management systems are used to illustrate the basic principles of emergency response system planning that can also be applied to urban fire, police and ambulance services.

Prerequisite: One course in quantitative methods or calculus
Recommended Preparation: ECO220Y1/ECO227Y1/GGR270H1/MAT133Y1/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR482H1    Toronto Field Course[TBA]

Examines the production of urban landscapes, built environments and social spaces in Toronto and surrounding areas through indepth case studies.  Coverage will vary some depending on instructor.  The course consists of local field trips and in-class seminars and lectures.  Students must apply with the Department. Contact the Department in January for deadlines. Course is limited by size.  Preference given to Geography SPE/MAJ/MIN.  Applications open to all students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR491Y1    Research Project

Specially designed for students wishing to gain experience in conducting research in their area of specialization. Of particular value for geographers interested in graduate study, or positions in government, planning and consulting firms where research skills may be an asset. Students select a research problem and complete a project under the supervision of a faculty member. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate; early discussion with a likely supervisor is encouraged. Enrolment may be completed at any time up to September; open to students in a Specialist or Major Program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 10 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR492H1    Senior Practicum

Students design and implement an independent applied geography/planning project in consultation with an employer (paid or volunteer), who will act as their “client.” Enrolment requires written permission from a staff supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR492Y1    Senior Practicum

 Students design and implement an independent applied geography/planning/GIS project in consultation with an employer (paid or volunteer), who will act as their “client”. Enrolment required written permission from a staff supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist, Major or GIS minor program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR497H1    Independent Research

Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Environmental Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCE's and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR498H1    Independent Research

Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Physical Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

GGR499H1    Independent Research

Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in a social science or humanities branch of Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Humanities or Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

Asian Geographies Courses
NUS250H0    Cities in Transition

This module is concerned with the changing roles of cities in an age of globalization. The first part examines cities as part of urban networks at the national, regional and international levels, and focuses on the implications arising from the rise of mega-cities and global cities. The second half of the module investigates the challenges facing cities on the ground, including issues of the revitalization and re-imaging of city cores, changing retail landscapes, and the impact of telecommunications on the location of urban activities and peoples’ mobility. The module is targeted at students with an interest in urban issues. (Co-listed as GE2204 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS251H0    Southeast Asia

This module deals with a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the regional geography of Southeast Asia. Students are expected not only to critically analyze their readings but also to be able to synthesize materials to provide a holistic understanding of the region. Specifically, it looks at the region through historical, cultural, social and political-economic perspectives. The module also discusses sustainable development issues. This is a module that is open to all students in the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, Engineering, Law, Science, School of Design & Environment and School of Business. (Co-listed as GE2226 National University of Singapore)

Exclusion: GGR342H1
Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS252H0    Rice, Spice & Trees: Peasants in Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia has been, and still is comprised of predominantly rural and agrarian societies. This module seeks to develop an understanding of peasant life in the region. Topics to be studied include the village as a construct, the “moral economy” of the peasantry, land and man relations, economic output, and peasant beliefs, consciousness, and cultural expressions. With the peasants’ increasing involvement in the world market and the nation-state, it is also important to consider the penetration of capitalism into the rural economy, as well as the demand for supra-village identification and loyalties. Notions of “development” as they pertain to the peasants, and as postulated by the state, non-governmental organizations and the peasants themselves are also discussed. (Co-listed as SE3213 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS253H0    Economy and Space

This module examines relationships between economy and space through a focus on ‘development’. Through interrogating theories, strategies and trajectories of ‘development’, students will develop an understanding of the past and contemporary global political economy and its geographies. The course will emphasize the geopolitical and cultural backdrops to ‘development’ and attendant economic geographies amidst debates about ‘globalization’, international trade and investment. (Co-listed as GE2202 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS254H0    Geographies of Social Life

This module explores debates in geography about social issues. It emphasizes the relationship between social identity and social space, and how different places reflect and shape diverse ways of life. The module examines the role of space in the interplay of different social groups (e.g. ethnic groups, men/women), and in relation to different aspects of daily life (e.g. housing, leisure). Its emphasis, however, is on how to think about these issues in different scales/contexts (streets, public spaces, global cities). The course is intended for geography majors, and students throughout NUS with an interest in the relationship between society and space. (Co-listed as SE2224 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS255H0    Cities and Urban Life in Southeast Asia

Are Southeast Asian urban models unique from those of the West? This module uses historical and emerging developments to re-evaluate debates on Southeast Asian urbanization. The particularities of Southeast Asian urbanisation will be examined both in terms of its intertwined history with the rest of the world as well as the politics of time and space. The module aims at developing a critical understanding of the interaction between historical, political-economic and cultural processes that constitute urbanization in Southeast Asia. (Co-listed as SE2212 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS256H0    Changing Landscape of Singapore

This module attempts to understand the rationale of changes in Singapore’s urban landscape. It places these changes within a framework that considers Singapore’s efforts to globalize and examines how policies are formulated with the idea of sustaining an economy that has integral links sub-regionally with Southeast Asia while developing new spatial linkages that will strengthen its position in the global network. Emphasis is also given to recent discussions about how diversity and difference in the perception and use of space pose a challenge to the utilitarian and functional definition adopted by the state. (Co-listed as GEK2001/SSA2202 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS350H0    Natural Resources: Policy and Practice

This module examines important geographical, ecological and political concepts and approaches to natural resources management. In particular, we focus on ownership regimes, access, exploitation and conservation in different social, economic and cultural contexts. Detailed cases of fisheries, forestry, freshwater and agriculture conflicts and problems are discussed. (Co-listed as GE3210 National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS351Y0    Field Studies in Geography: SE Asia

The module exposes students to different geographical methods, both human and physical, and as such it is an ideal preparation for any student wishing to undertake further primary research at higher levels in geography, and other social science disciplines. After a series of lectures/seminars on fieldwork methods, fieldwork ethics, and health and safety issues in the field (which may include some basic introductory language classes), students then undertake a 2 – 5 week period of field study overseas, depending on logistical and other constraints. Previous field studies have been for periods of 4-5 weeks overseas in Thailand and Malaysia. While overseas, students undergo orientation workshops, meet peers in host universities, and visit potential field sites before conducting an intensive period of fieldwork in small groups of 3-5 students. (Co-listed as GE3230A at the National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None

NUS352H0    East Asia

This module examines aspects of the geography of East Asia, which includes China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea. Emphasis is placed on the developmental processes and the underlying physical, political, socio-cultural and economic factors that account for their development. It evaluates various discourses on East Asian development and also assesses the impact of East Asian development on regional conflicts, patterns of social change, urbanization and sub-regional integration. (Co-listed as GE3209 at the National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS353H0    Globalization and Asian Cities

This module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the social, political, and economic changes at various geographical scales with respect to globalization. More specifically, the module focuses on developing understandings of the complex forces driving globalization and the related urban and regional changes and the relationship between globalization and regionalization. This module is not just for geography students, but for all students who are interested in the urban and regional changes in the Asia-Pacific with respect to globalization and regionalization and the driving forces of the changes. (Co-listed as GE3219 at the National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

NUS354H0    South Asia: Development, Issues, Debates

This module is concerned with understanding and assessing the development experiences of the South Asian countries. Students are expected to grapple with concrete case studies of development programs in their work. The coursework covers issues pertaining to rural, agricultural, urban, industrial and human development, as well as their impact upon people and the environment. Particular attention is given to the situation of the poor and the weak, including disadvantaged children, women, and ethnic minorities. (Co-listed as SN3232 at the National University of Singapore)

Recommended Preparation: 4.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)