Faculty of Arts & Science
2014-2015 Calendar

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Woodsworth College

Faculty


Senior Lecturers
W.B. MacDonald, BA, MA
T. Moritz, MA, Ph D
J.B. Rose, BA, MA
T.P. Socknat, MA, Ph D

Lecturer
B. Fischer, MA, Ph D

Woodsworth College is the home of Woodsworth ONE, First-Year Seminars, the Summer Abroad, TESOL Certificate and THE500 programs.  Woodsworth College is also the home of two major access programs:  The Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program and the Diploma to Degree Facilitated Transfer Programs. 

In 2013, the undergraduate Criminology and Employment Relations programs became integrated with the graduate programs at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources respectively.  The continuing relationship between the Centres and Woodsworth College will help to foster ongoing academic excellence for students enrolled in the Criminology and Employment Relations programs as they will continue to benefit from the rich academic support services and facilities available at the College. Woodsworth College remains the home of the Undergraduate Program Office and the undergraduate students' associations.

Woodsworth College
119 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario,
M5S 1A9
w:www.wdw.utoronto.ca 

Listed in this order:

Woodsworth ONE
First-Year Seminars
Summer Abroad Programs
Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program
Diploma to Degree
Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Programs
Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Programs

Followed by:

Woodsworth College Courses
Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Courses
Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Courses


Woodsworth ONE

Woodsworth ONE offers first-year students an intellectually challenging introduction to university-level studies, and builds students’ sense of community within Woodsworth College and across the University of Toronto as a whole.  It is designed to complement other first-year courses, thereby enhancing academic success in the first year and beyond. WDW One promotes the development of strong critical thinking, information literacy, oral and written communication skills, and awareness of both the distinctive nature of particular academic disciplines and the practices and values common to all academic work. 

Focused on the theme of “Order and Disorder,” students take two half-credit seminars – one in each term – and participate in weekly co-curricular activities. Seminars are capped at 25 students to maximize opportunities for participation and to promote close contact with both the instructor and fellow students.  The courses draw upon Sociology, Political Science, History, Philosophy, Economics, and Psychology to explore how order arises and collapses in societies, markets, and across the globe. The emphasis is on class discussion and problem-based learning. Students participate in role-playing games, simulations, debates and more. The co-curricular activities include field trips, film screenings, guest speakers, writing and research workshops, and test-taking seminars.

The Woodsworth ONE team is dedicated to supporting students’ transition to university life, and to guiding their academic planning. The team includes a Writing Centre, a Learning Strategist, a dedicated Registrar, a program administrator, student mentors, the professor, and a Teaching Assistant. Each member of the team seeks to create a strong sense of community and to set students up for academic success. 

Woodsworth ONE is geared towards first-year students enrolled in Social Sciences and Humanities within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. In keeping with Woodworth College’s tradition of open access, there is no incoming grade requirement.  Applicants must submit an application that is available on our website.

Students participating in any other One program are excluded from Woodsworth ONE.

Enquiries: 
e:  one.wdw@utoronto.ca
w:  Woodsworth ONE (http://wdw.utoronto.ca/wdwone/)


First-Year Seminars

The 199Y1 and 199H1 seminars are designed to provide first-year students with the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a class of no more than twenty-four students.  Each Seminar focuses on specific disciplinary or interdisciplinary issues, questions or controversies of particular interest to the instructor, and introduces the students to the excitement of discovery inherent in academic work at the University of Toronto. In addition, students are encouraged to develop their ability to think analytically and to express ideas and logical arguments clearly and coherently, both orally and in writing.

Enquiries: 
w:  First-Year Seminars (http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/fyh-1)


Summer Abroad Programs

Prepare yourself for a future in the global village by participating in a Summer Abroad program and complete a University of Toronto course overseas in three to six weeks. These programs are designed to enrich students’ academic lives by providing an exciting and educational international experience.  Your learning will not be limited to the classroom; you will observe and experience many of the things you study, including the language, history, culture, art, religion, business, and politics of the host country.

The list of summer offerings is published every January.  The 2014 summer schedule is available here

Enquiries:
Woodsworth College
119 St. George Street, 3rd floor                                                         
Toronto Ontario, M5S 1A9   
t: 416-978-8713

e:  summer.abroad@utoronto.ca
w:  Summer Abroad (http://www.wdw.utoronto.ca)


Millie Rotman Shime Academic Bridging Program

Academic Bridging is designed for individuals who have been away from formal education for some time and do not meet the University’s established requirements for direct entry admission; each course is intended to bridge the gap between a student’s prior education and the requirements of first year university courses in Humanities and Social Sciences.  Both part-time and full-time options are available to students.  Students who successfully complete the Academic Bridging Program are admitted to the Faculty of Arts and Science, at the University of Toronto, with at least one full credit towards their degree for those who complete the part-time Academic Briding Program.  Students who complete the full-time program may transfer up to two full credits towards their degree.

Enquiries:
Woodsworth College
119 St. George Street, Room 220B                                                          
Toronto Ontario, M5S 1A9   
t: 416-978-7487
e:  academic.bridging@utoronto.ca
w:  Academic Bridging Program  (http://www.wdw.utoronto.ca)


Diploma to Degree

Joint Seneca-Woodsworth Facilitated Transfer Program
The Joint Seneca-Woodsworth Facilitated Transfer Program provides students with a potential pathway from the Liberal Arts diploma program at Seneca College to the Faculty of Arts and Science at the St. George campus of the University of Toronto with significant transfer credit.  To be eligible to transfer, students must complete the 2-year Liberal Arts diploma with a minimum 3.0 GPA, receive a recommendation from Seneca College to transfer, and have completed at least one half course in the Faculty of Arts and Science with a minimum 60%. The program is designed for students to transfer into programs in the social sciences and humanities, and work towards an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Toronto.    

2014-15 Facilitated Transfer Pilot Programs
Woodsworth College is introducing two pilot programs with George Brown and Humber Colleges in the 2014-15 academic year.  These programs provide students with a potential pathway from the Liberal Arts diploma program at their Community College to the Faculty of Arts and Science at the St. George campus of the University of Toronto with significant transfer credit. 

Enquiries:
e:   diplomatodegree@utoronto.ca
w:  Diploma to Degree (http://www.wdw.utoronto.ca)


Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies with Woodsworth College

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies incorporates theory, research methods, and knowledge from a wide range of other disciplines such as history, political science, philosophy, sociology, psychology, law and economics. The program provides students with a sound foundation for the understanding of crime and the administration of justice in Canada and abroad, and, more generally, the processes of social order and disorder.  Most students combine their studies in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies with programs in Political Science, Psychology or Sociology.

People with backgrounds in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies are found working in Correctional Services, Law Enforcement, Courts and other settings.  A  career in the Criminology field requires additional education and experience beyond the undergraduate level.  A comprehensive career information page is available on the Program Office website.

Students follow the program requirements for the year in which they were admitted to the major or specialist program.  The requirements are published on the Program Office website.

Enquiries:
Program Office, Criminology and Sociolegal Studies 
Woodsworth College
119 St. George Street, Room 236
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A9 
t: 416.978.5783
e: crim@utoronto.ca
w: Criminology (http://www.wdw.utoronto.ca/)


Criminology and Sociolegal Studies  (Arts Program)

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Major - Program Admission:
This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students.  Achieving the minimum mark threshold does not guarantee admission to the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies major in any given year.

Requests for admission will be considered in the first subject POSt request period only.   Eligibility will be based on a student’s mark in the required courses listed below. The precise mark threshold is an estimate of what will be required in the 2014 subject POSt admission cycle. Due to the limited enrolment nature of this program students are strongly advised to enroll in a in a backup program or programs.

Applying after first year:  Students may apply to this subject POSt after completion of at least four full-course equivalents which must include the following:

2.0 FCEs  at the 100 or higher level from ECO/HIS/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC.  Any combination from this list is acceptable.  Courses with other course designators will not be accepted. Admission will be determined by a student’s marks in these 2.0 FCEs taken in the most recent session.  It is expected that a minimum combined average of 70% in these 2.0 FCEs will be required for admission in 2014.

Applying after second or third year:  Same as above. 

Note: It may take a little over two years to complete this program.  Do not change your program of study if you are required to complete your degree in four years as prerequisites and program requirements will not be waived.  For more information check the following link: Can I complete the major in 2 years? 

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Specialist - Program Admission:

This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students.  Achieving the minimum mark thresholds does not guarantee admission to the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies specialist in any given year.

Requests for admission will be considered in the first subject POSt request period only.   Eligibility will be based on a student’s mark in the required courses listed below. The precise mark thresholds are an estimate of what will be required in the 2014 subject POSt admission cycle.  Due to the limited enrolment nature of this program students are strongly advised to enroll in a in a backup program or programs.

Applying after first year:  There is no admission to this program after first year.

Applying after second year:  Student must be enrolled in the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies major (ASMAJ0826) and have completed a minimum of 8.0 FCEs including CRI205H1/WDW205H1, CRI210H1/WDW210H1 and CRI225H1/WDW225H1.   A minimum combined average of at least 80% in CRI205H1/WDW205H1, CRI210H1/WDW210H1 and CRI225H1/WDW225H1 is required.

Applying after third year: Student must be enrolled in the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies major (ASMAJ0826) and have completed at least 12.0 FCEs and have a minimum combined average of 80% in the following 3.0 FCEs:

Four 300+ level half-credit "CRI" or "WDW Criminology" lecture or seminar courses and 1.0 FCE from CRI205H1/WDW205H1, CRI210H1/WDW210H1 and CRI225H1/WDW225H1.

Notes:

  1. Do not change your program of study if you are required to complete your degree in four years as prerequisites and program requirements will not be waived.  
  2. The precise mark thresholds outlined above are an estimate of what will be required in the 2014 subject POSt admission cycle. Achieving the minimum mark threshold does not guarantee admission to the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies specialist in any given year.

How to request admission to the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Subject POSts:
There is one request period only (April 1 - May 15).  Application is made on-line using the Type 3 application form (not ROSI).   Subject POSt codes:  Major = ASMAJ0826.  Specialist = ASSPE0826.

How to enrol in Type 3 subject POSts:
Step 1: apply to the Type 3 subject POSt during round 1 (April 1 - May 15) using the Type 3 Application Form
Step 2: enrol in a backup program or programs (April 1 - May 15)
Step 3: on July 2 check the SWS to see if the department has given you an "invitation" to enrol
Step 4: accept the invitation to enrol on the SWS (deadline to accept is August 7)

For detailed information and instructions see Subject POSt Enrolment.


Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Programs with Woodsworth College

The overarching goal of the undergraduate program in Employment Relations is to offer an interdisciplinary learning opportunity in which to study the employment relationship in a Canadian and global context from the perspectives of economics, history, law, management, political science and sociology.  The program provides students with a theoretical background and knowledge of current developments in the labour field that will serve as a basis for careers in employment relations and human resources, such as a Human Resources Generalist, Recruitment Specialist, Employment Equity Officer, Training and Development Consultant, Corporate Trainer, and Labour Relations Specialist.

Students are encouraged to make use of the  resources and activities  available in both the CIRHR Library and Career Centre in order to investigate current labour market trends and career options in Employment Relations.    Students are also encouraged to explore the services offered by the Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA) which is Canada’s HR thought leader and the largest HR association in the country.   In Ontario, HRPA regulates the HR profession and issues the Certified Human Resources Professional (CHRP) designation, the national standard for excellence in human resources management.  All of the course work requirements needed for CHRP are offered in the Employment Relations program.  

Students follow the program requirements for the year in which they were admitted to the major or specialist program.  Program requirements are available on the Employment Relations website.

Enquiries:

Program Office, Employment Relations
Woodsworth College
University of Toronto
119 St. George Street, Room 236
Toronto, ON M5S 1A9
t: 416.978.5783
e: er@utoronto.ca
w: Employment Relations (http://www.wdw.utoronto.ca/)

HRPA
150 Bloor St E #200
Toronto, ON M4W 3E2
t: 416.923.2324
w:  www.hrpa.ca


Employment Relations (Arts Program)

Employment Relations Specialist - Program Admission:

This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students.  Achieving the minimum mark thresholds does not guarantee admission to the Employment Relations specialist in any given year.  Due to the limited enrolment nature of this program students are strongly advised to enroll in a backup program or programs.

Requests for admission will be considered in the first subject POSt request period only.   Eligibility will be based on a student’s mark in the required courses listed below. The precise mark thresholds outlined below are an estimate of what will be required in the 2014 subject POSt admission cycle.  

Applying after first year:  Students may apply to this subject POSt after completion of at least four full-course equivalents which must include the following:  ECO100Y1(67%)/ECO105Y1(80%) and SOC101Y1(70%)/1.0 FCE (70% average) from SOC102H1/SOC103H1/PSY100H1.

Applying after second or third year:  ECO100Y1(67%)/ECO105Y1(80%) and 1.0 FCE (75% average) SOC200+ level course. 

Note: It may take up to three years to complete this program.  Do not change your program of study if you are required to complete your degree within four years as course prerequisites and program requirements will not be waived.  

Employment Relations Major - Program Admission:
This is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students.  Achieving the minimum mark thresholds does not guarantee admission to the Employment Relations major in any given year.  Requests for admission will be considered in the first subject POSt request period only.  Eligibility will be based on a student’s mark in the required courses listed below. The precise mark thresholds outlined below are an estimate of what will be required in the 2014 subject POSt admission cycle.    Due to the limited enrolment nature of this program students are strongly advised to enroll in a backup program or programs.

Applying after first year:  Students may apply to this subject POSt after completion of at least four full-course equivalents which must include the following:  ECO100Y1 (or ECO105Y1) and SOC101Y1 (or 1.0 FCE from:  SOC102H1/SOC103H1/PSY100H1).  It is expected that a combined average of 65% will be required for admission in 2014.

Applying after second or third year:  Admission will be determined by a student’s mark in ECO100Y1 (or ECO105Y1) and 1.0 FCE  SOC200+ level course. It is expected that a combined average of 70% will be required for admission in 2014. 

Note: It may take a little over two years to complete this program.  Do not change your program of study if you are required to complete your degree within four years as prerequisites and program requirements will not be waived.  


How to request admission to the Employment Relations subject POSts:

There is one request period only (April 1 - May 15).  Application is made on-line using the Type 3 application form (not ROSI).   Subject POSt codes:  Major = ASMAJ1535.  Specialist = ASMAJ1535.

Step 1: apply to the Type 3 subject POSt during round 1 (April 1 - May 15) using the Type 3 Application Form
Step 2: enrol in a backup program or programs (April 1 - May 15)
Step 3: on July 2 check the SWS to see if the department has given you an "invitation" to enrol
Step 4: accept the invitation to enrol on the SWS (deadline to accept is August 7)

For additional information and instructions please see Subject POSt Enrolment.

Woodsworth College Courses


Followed by:

Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Courses
Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Courses


Woodsworth ONE
WDW151H1    Order and Disorder I: Issues and Perspectives[16T/24S]

Societies require law and order, but at what point does order become oppression?  How do we balance our need for freedom and society’s need for order?  This interdisciplinary seminar allows students to explore these and related questions through selected readings introducing theories from sociology, political science, philosophy, and history. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to Woodsworth One
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, St. Mike's One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

WDW152H1    Order and Disorder II: Problems and Solutions[16T/24S]

Building on the questions and theoretical perspectives discussed in WDW151H1, this interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to some of the methods used by scholars and researchers in sociology, political science, philosophy, and history to develop, test, and debate possible solutions to the problems of social order and disorder. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: WDW151H1 or permission from the Program Coordinator
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, St. Mike's One, Trinity One, UC One, Vic One
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

2014 Summer Abroad Courses

The 2015 course list will be published on the Summer Abroad website in January 2015.

Argentina
POL380Y Topics in International Politics: Localizing Global Governance

Australia
ENV396Y Special Topics: Australian Environment, Wildlife and Conservation

Central Europe
HIS389Y Topics in History: The City in Central Europe: Imperial Pasts, Imperial Aspirations, Wars & Revolutions
RSM395Y Special Topics: Strategy in a European Context

China
CIN376Y Contemporary Chinese Cinemas (Hong Kong)
EAS395Y Selected Topics in East Asian Studies: Leadership and Governance (Hong Kong)
HIS385Y The History of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)
HMB394Y International Research Project in Human Biology (Science Abroad:China and Taiwan)
POL376Y  Transforming Global Politics: Comparative and Chinese Perspectives (Shanghai)
RLG290Y  Religion in Hong Kong (Hong Kong)
RSM295Y Special Topics: International Management (Hong Kong)
RSM395Y Special Topics: Capitalism in China (Hong Kong)

Ecuador
ENV395Y Special Topics Field Course: Ecology and Conservation in the Amazon, Galápagos, and Andes

England
CRI389Y Topics in Criminology: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities in Criminal Law: England and Canada
HIS389Y Topics in History: Europe and the World 1800-1945
HPS300Y Britain and the Rise of Modern Science
POL380Y Topics in International Politics: Human Rights and International Relations

France
FSL***Y  French language courses (various levels)

Germany
GGR300Y Special Topics: The City as Problem and Promise
RSM295Y Special Topics: History and Function of Financial Institutions

Hungary
CHM396Y Research Topic Abroad (Science Abroad)

Italy
ANT396Y Special Topics: Italian Regional Foodways and Culture
FAH394Y Studies Abroad in Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture
IRE332Y Special Topics: Cross Cultural Perspectives on Leadership
ITA102Y Practical Italian
ITA358/359Y Modern Italian Culture
ITA395Y Special Topics: Tuscany, the Birthplace of the Italian Language
POL321Y Nation Building: Ethnic Politics in Comparative Perspective
RSM395Y Special Topics: International Marketing

Japan
EAS***Y  Japanese language courses at various levels

Peru
ANT395Y Special Topics: Field Archaeology

South Africa
ANT396Y Research Topic Abroad (Science Abroad)

Spain
SPA255Y Hispanic Culture

Switzerland
PHY396Y Research Topic Abroad (Science Abroad)

Southeast Europe
POL368Y  Return to Europe:  Bringing Southeast Europe into the European Union

United Arab Emirates
RSM395Y Special Topics: International Management and Financial Accounting


Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Courses
Note:

Not all courses are offered every year.  Please check the timetable for the list of current course offerings.  Enrolment in "CRI" courses (except CRI215H1) is restricted to students in the Criminology and Sociolegal subject POSts (ASMAJ0826/ASSPE0826). Students without course prerequisites will be removed at any time they are discovered.  Course enrolment conditions are listed in the "Enrolment Indicator" and "Enrolment Controls" columns in the Arts and Science timetable.  Course descriptions, prerequisites, corequisites and exclusions are listed below.


CRI205H1    Introduction to Criminology (formerly WDW205H1)[24L/12T]

An introduction to the study of crime and criminal behaviour. The concept of crime, the process of law formation, and the academic domain of criminology. Theories of crime causation, methodologies used by criminologists, and the complex relationship between crime, the media and modern politics.

Prerequisite: Open to students in the Criminology and Sociolegal Studies program (ASMAJ0826)
Corequisite: CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW205H1, WDW200Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI210H1    Criminal Justice (formerly WDW210H1)[24L/12T]

An introduction to the Canadian criminal justice system. The institutions established by government to respond to crime and control it; how they operate, and the larger function they serve; including the role of the police, the trial process, courts and juries, sentencing, imprisonment and community corrections.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1)
Exclusion: WDW210H1, WDW200Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI215H1    Introduction to Sociolegal Studies (formerly WDW215H1)[24L/12T]

The course covers several major issues that will help prepare students for advanced courses in the criminology major:  the meaning of law, the production of laws and legal institutions, law in action, comparative legal traditions, and the methodology of sociolegal studies.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCEs and a minimum cgpa of 2.3 or registered in the Criminology and Sociolegal subject POSt (ASMAJ0826/ASSPE0826)
Exclusion: WDW215H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI225H1    Criminal Law (formerly WDW225H1)[24L/12T]

The main principles and themes of Canadian criminal law; legal definitions of crime, requirements of a criminal act (actus reus), criminal intention (mens rea), causation and defences. The origins, goals and functioning of criminal law, and limits on the power of the state to criminalize behaviour.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1
Corequisite: CRI205H1
Exclusion: WDW225H1, WDW220Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI300H1    Theories of Criminal Justice (formerly WDW300H1)[36L]

A survey of the evolution of normative theories of criminal justice, which examines how major theorists from the Enlightenment to the contemporary period have understood the normative justification for criminal prohibition and punishment.  Although the course focuses on western political philosophy and social science, there will also be some attention to theories of criminal justice in selected non-western traditions.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y)
Exclusion: WDW300H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI325H1    Criminal Procedure (formerly WDW325H1)[24L/12T]

The main principles and themes of Canadian criminal procedure, and the role of state officials and institutions in investigating and prosecuting crime. Doctrinal and statutory frameworks governing the administration and enforcement of criminal law in Canada, and the role of constitutional rights in the criminal process.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1)/WDW200Y1
Exclusion: WDW325H1, WDW220Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI335H1    Policing (formerly WDW335H1)[36L]

A theoretical framework is developed to examine the nature of policing, its structure and function. Attention is given to the history of policing and to its public and private forms. An examination of the objectives and domain, as well as the strategies, powers, and authority of contemporary policing; including decision-making, wrong-doing, accountability, and the decentralization of policing.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW335H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI340H1    Punishment: Theory and Practice (formerly WDW340H1)[36L]

The study of punishment from historical and philosophical perspectives, with a focus on contemporary Canadian policy issues. Topics covered include penal theory, prisons and non-carceral forms of punishment, and the goals of penal reform.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW340H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI343H1    Comparative Criminal Justice (formerly WDW343H1)[36L]

Criminal justice issues outside Canada, based on a variety of international and historical studies. The evolution of criminal justice systems in Western Europe, including the English adversarial and continental European inquisitorial approaches. A comparison of policing, criminal procedure, forms of punishment, and crime rates in the contemporary world.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW393H1 taken in 2008-09, WDW343H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI350H1    Understanding Criminological Research (formerly WDW350H1)[36L]

An introduction to social science research methods used by criminologists. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of published criminological research is developed. Specific technical issues such as sampling and measurement are taught in the context of examining alternative ways of answering research questions.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: SOC200H1, SOC200Y1, WDW350H1, WDW350Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI365H1    Crime and Mind (formerly WDW365H1)[36L]

Legal, psychological and sociological understandings of issues in the criminal justice system, through a consideration of topics including: criminal intent, the insanity defence, the concept of psychopathy, the use of battered woman syndrome as part of a self-defence, issues of transcultural psychiatry, and jury screening for bias.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW365H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI370H1    Youth Justice (formerly WDW370H1)[36L]

The course will examine what is known about offending by youths and the various purposes that have been attributed to youth justice systems.  The course will focus, in large part, however, on the nature of the laws and youth justice systems that have been designed in Canada and elsewhere to respond to offending by youths.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW370H1, WDW375H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI380H1    Crime, Gender and Sex (formerly WDW380H1)[36L]

Theory, research and policy related to the ways in which gender shapes criminal behaviour, the administration of criminal justice, and the criminal law. How notions of different types of masculinity and femininity are embedded in and influence both the operation of the criminal justice system as well as criminal behaviours. The regulation of gender and sexuality through the criminal law and through crime.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1)/(SOC212H1 and enrolment in ASMAJ/SPE 1013 Sociology or Criminology and Sociolegal subject POSt)
Exclusion: WDW380H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI383H1    Immigration and Crime (formerly WDW383H1)[36L]

The connection between immigration and crime, the effect of immigration on crime rates, discrimination against immigrants, the representation of immigrants in crime statistics, public perception of risk and security, and criminal justice policy changes which affect immigration. We consider research conducted in North America and Europe.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y)
Exclusion: WDW383H1, WDW390H1 in 2008
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI385H1    Representing Crime and Authority (formerly WDW385H1)[36L]

Cultural constructions of crime, disorder, dangerousness and risk are integral parts of the criminal justice system. A critical analysis of how police, crown attorneys, judges and the media construct their authority through symbols and images, in order to “explain” and manage crime, and how these representations are regarded in public discourse.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1),(CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW385H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI387H1    Legal Regulation of Morality (formerly WDW387H1)[36L]

Moral regulation through criminal law, and the role of legal texts and procedures in promoting certain values while marginalizing others. The decriminalization of homosexuality and abortion, the censorship of pornography, the key role of administrative law mechanisms, and the transformation from direct to indirect forms of regulation.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1)/(UNI255H1/UNI256H1)
Exclusion: WDW391H1 in 2002, WDW387H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI389Y0    Topics in Criminology Abroad (formerly WDW389Y0)[TBA]

Topics in Criminology offered in an international setting. The content may vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: Consult the Summer Abroad Program Office.
Exclusion: WDW389Y0
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI390H1    Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW390H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y). Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for further information.
Exclusion: WDW390H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI391H1    Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW391H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y). Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for further information.
Exclusion: WDW391H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI392H1    Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW392H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y). Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for further information.
Exclusion: WDW392H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI393H1    Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW393H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y) Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for further information.
Exclusion: WDW393H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI394H1    Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW394H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y ), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y) Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for further information.
Exclusion: WDW394H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI395H1    Independent Study (formerly WDW395H1 Criminology) [TBA]

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member.  Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise.  Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1, CRI210H1/WDW210H1, CRI225H1/WDW225H1 and at least 3 CRI/WDW Criminology 300 half-credit courses. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW395H1 Criminology
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI395Y1    Independent Study (formerly WDW395Y1 Criminology) [TBA]

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member.  Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1/WDW205H1, CRI210H1/WDW210H1, CRI225H1/WDW225H1 and at least 3 CRI/WDW Criminology 300 half-credit courses. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW395Y1 Criminology
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI396H1    Research Participation (formerly WDW396H1 Criminology) [TBA]

Credit course for supervised participation in a faculty research project. Offered only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 9 FCEs. A CGPA of at least 3.0 is recommended. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW396H1 Criminology
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI397Y1    Research Participation (formerly WDW397Y1 Criminology) [TBA]

Credit course for supervised participation in a faculty research project. Offered only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 9 FCEs. A CGPA of at least 3.0 is recommended. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW397Y1 Criminology
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI415H1    Politics and Crime (formerly WDW415H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar examining the development of criminal justice and penal policies in Canada, the United States, Western Europe and Russia; the way authorities in those countries define and manage political deviance and the intrusion of politics into the administration of justice, especially in non-democratic settings.

Prerequisite: A minimum average of 77% in four 300-level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit courses and a cgpa of at least 3.3
Exclusion: CRI3120H1, WDW415H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI425H1    The Prosecution Process (formerly WDW425H1)[36L]

A critical examination of the process by which certain conduct is identified, prosecuted and punished as “crime”, and the process by which individuals become “criminals”.  The evolution of the modern prosecution system, including the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, rules of evidence, socially constructed defences, disparity in sentencing, and wrongful convictions.

Prerequisite: (CRI205H1/WDW205H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI210H1/WDW210H1/WDW200Y1), (CRI225H1/WDW225H1/WDW220Y1), (CRI325H1/WDW325H1/WDW220Y1)
Exclusion: WDW320H1, WDW425H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI427H1    Organized Crime and Corruption (formerly WDW427H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar exploring the history and characteristics of organized crime and corruption.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: WDW427H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI428H1    Neighbourhoods and Crime (formerly WDW428H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar exploring the connection between neighbourhoods and the perpetuation of poverty, social marginalization, segregation and crime.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: WDW428H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI429H1    Youth Culture, Racialization and Crime in the Global Context (formerly WDW429H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar exploring youth culture and its possible connection to criminality from an international perspective.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: WDW429H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI431H1    Mental Disorders, Morality and Legal Controls (formerly WDW431H1)[24S]

A critical exploration of contemporary debates in criminology, and legal and moral philosophy concerning the diagnostic and criminal justice labeling of mental disorders such as psychopathy and paedophilia, and their representation in popular culture.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: WDW431H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI435H1    Advanced Seminar in Policing (formerly WDW435H1)[24S]

This course will explore policing in a comparative and historical context. Issues to be covered include the following: the maintenance of law and order before police forces; development of police forces in continental Europe and the English-speaking world; structure and function of national police forces around the world today; the role of political and secret police forces; and contemporary debates on the mission and regulation of the police in contemporary North America including issues such as police-community relations, private policing, and counter-terrorism.

Prerequisite: A minimum average of 77% in four 300-level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit courses
Exclusion: CRI3130H1, WDW435H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI445H1    International Criminal Law (formerly WDW445H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar focusing on the legal and conceptual framework for responding to state violence and war crimes, and the challenges faced by various international legal institutions.  Legal doctrines of sovereign immunity and universal jurisdiction, the history of international criminal prosecutions, and substantive international criminal law are examined.

Prerequisite: A minimum average of 77% in four 300-level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit courses
Exclusion: CRI3340H1, WDW425H1 taken in 2008-2009; WDW445H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI450H1    Criminology Research (formerly WDW450H1)[TBA]

An individual research project under the direction of a Criminology faculty member. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator is required.  Form is available on the Program Office website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Minimum 75% average in 8 CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit courses and a CGPA of at least 3.0.
Exclusion: WDW450H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI480H1    Interpersonal Violence (formerly WDW480H1)[24S]

The meaning, purposes and sources of interpersonal violence, including an examination of debates over defining and documenting violence, and a review of the research on the relationships between illegitimate, interpersonal violence and state-approved or state-initiated violence. Cultural, social and individual correlates of interpersonal violence; the violence of the law; and how violence is justified and denied.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: WDW400H1 in 2004-2006, WDW480H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI487H1    Law, Space, and Regulation (formerly WDW487H1)[24S]

An introduction to interdisciplinary studies of law and space, this course covers a broad range of topics, from work on empire and colonialism by legal historians and aboriginal scholars to studies of national spaces, urban spaces, and bodily spaces. Some background in either legal studies or cultural geography is desirable. Open to students in law, geography, anthropology, women/gender studies, and sociology, though permission of the instructor is required.

Prerequisite: A minimum average of 77% in four 300-level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit courses
Exclusion: CRI3256H1, WDW487H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI490H1    Advanced Topics in Criminology (formerly WDW490H1)[24S]

Topics vary from year to year.  The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses. Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for information.
Exclusion: WDW490H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI491H1    Advanced Topics In Criminology (formerly WDW491H1)[24S]

Topics vary from year to year.  The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: Minimum two 300+ level CRI/WDW Criminology half-credit lecture/seminar courses. Additional prerequisites depending on topic. Consult the Program website for information.
Exclusion: WDW491H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources Courses
Note:

Not all courses are offered every year.  Please check the timetable for the list of current course offerings.  Enrolment in 300+ level "IRE" courses  is restricted to students in the Employment Relations subject POSts (ASMAJ1535/ASSPE1535). Students without course prerequisites will be removed at any time they are discovered.  Course enrolment conditions are listed in the "Enrolment Indicator" and "Enrolment Controls" columns in the Arts and Science timetable.  Course descriptions, prerequisites, corequisites and exclusions are listed below.


IRE240H1    Introduction to Employment Relations (formerly WDW240H1)[36L]

An introduction to the study of the world of work and employment, the history and development of employment relations, its central theories and concepts; the behaviours, outcomes, practices and institutions that emerge from or affect the employment relationship; contemporary issues and comparative employment relations systems.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Employment Relations subject posts (ASSPE/ASMAJ1535) or 4.0 FCEs and a minimum cgpa of 2.3.
Exclusion: WDW240H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE244H1    Labour Relations (formerly WDW244H1)[36L]

Introduction to the institutions, issues and legislation affecting the employment relationship in the public and private sectors in Canada, with emphasis on collective bargaining. The economic and political environment, history of the labour movement, union organization, certification, contract negotiation, strikes, dispute resolution, contract administration and grievances.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Employment Relations subject post (ASSPE1535/ASMAJ1535) or 4.0 FCEs and a minimum cgpa of 2.3.
Exclusion: ECO244Y1, WDW244H1, WDW244Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE260H1    Organizational Behaviour (formerly WDW260H1)[36L]

Introduction to the nature of organizations and the behaviour of individuals and groups within organizations, including topics such as culture and diversity, reward systems, motivation, leadership, politics, communication, decision-making, conflict and group processes. Not recommended for students in Commerce programs.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Employment Relations subject post (ASSPE1535/ASMAJ1535) or 4.0 FCEs and a minimum 2.3 cgpa.
Exclusion: MGT262H1, RSM260H1, WDW260H1, WDW260Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE332Y0    Topics in Employment Relations (Summer Abroad Program) (formerly WDW332Y0)[TBA]

Topics in Employment Relations offered in an international setting. The content may vary from year to year.  For more information check the Summer Abroad website.

Exclusion: WDW332Y0
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE339H1    Labour Markets and Public Policy (formerly WDW339H1)[36L]

This course is designed to provide students in the Employment Relations program with knowledge of how the labour market affects the employment relationship. The basic tools of labour economics are developed and applied to various issues of organizational and government policy such as: the incentive effects of compensation arrangements, government income support programs, and minimum wage policy; the determinants of preferences for hours of work including job-sharing, overtime and retirement; the impacts of unions on compensation and productivity; public-sector employment and alternatives to the right to strike; discrimination in employment on the basis of gender and race as well as related government policies such as pay and employment equity.
Note:  IRE339H1 will not count towards an ECO subject post.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1/ECO105Y1
Exclusion: ECO239Y1, ECO339Y1, WDW339H1, ECO261H5
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE344H1    Topics in Employment Relations (formerly WDW344H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current employment relations issues and their economic, legal, political and social implications.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1. Additional prerequisites depending on topic. See program website for detailed information.
Exclusion: WDW344H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE345H1    Topics in Employment Relations (formerly WDW345H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current employment relations issues and their economic, legal, political and social implications. 

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1. Additional prerequisites depending on topic. See program website for detailed information.
Exclusion: WDW345H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE346H1    Human Resource Planning (formerly WDW346H1)[36L]

An understanding is developed of how essential elements of the human resource planning process support organizational goals and strategies. Topics such as environmental influences, job analysis, forecasting human resource needs and ascertaining supply, succession planning, downsizing and restructuring, mergers and acquisitions, outsourcing, and strategic international issues are examined.

Prerequisite: IRE240H1/WDW240H1/IRE244H1/WDW244H1/IRE260H1/WDW260H1/
Exclusion: WDW346H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE347H1    Training and Development (formerly WDW347H1)[36L]

The role of training and development initiatives in organizations. Students acquire the knowledge and skills to conduct a training needs assessment, identify training objectives, explore strategies to increase the transfer of training, design and deliver a training activity using various training methodologies, and evaluate its effectiveness.

Prerequisite: IRE260H1/WDW260H1
Exclusion: WDW347H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE348H1    Recruitment and Selection (formerly WDW348H1)[36L]

The principles, legal issues, and emerging trends affecting the recruitment process and selection of staff in organizations.  Development of recruitment strategies, assessment of applications for employment, interviewing candidates, and the role of testing and measurement of competencies in making hiring decisions.

Prerequisite: IRE240H1/WDW240H1/IRE244H1/WDW244H1/IRE260H1/WDW260H1/
Exclusion: WDW348H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE349H1    Topics in Employment Relations (formerly WDW349H1)[36L]

Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current employment relations issues and their economic, legal, political and social implications. 

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1. Additional prerequisites depending on topic. See program website for detailed information.
Exclusion: WDW349H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE367H1    Compensation (formerly WDW367H1)[36L]

The theory and process of developing and administering compensation systems. Through the core compensation principles of efficiency, equity, consistency and competitiveness we consider such topics as: job analysis, job evaluation, pay levels and structures, pay for performance, benefits, and compensating special groups of workers.

Prerequisite: IRE260H1/WDW260H1/RSM260H1
Exclusion: WDW367H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE378H1    Employment Health (formerly WDW378H1)[36L]

The influence of legislation, the labour market and collective bargaining on health policies and programs in the workplace. The rights and responsibilities of employers, employees, unions and governments for the regulation and promotion of workplace health and safety; and the implications of evolving demographic, economic, and social factors.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1/IRE260H1/WDW260H1
Exclusion: WDW378H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE379H1    Employment Relations Research and Human Resource Analytics (formerly WDW379H1)[36L]

An introduction to fundamental quantitative and qualitative research methods to enable students to critically evaluate and conduct research in the labour field.  The class will explore data-driven, analytical approaches to managing human resources using basic metrics, analysis, and interpretation of information that link human resource initiatives to various indicators of organizational performance.

Prerequisite: IRE240H1/WDW240H1/IRE244H1/WDW244H1/IRE260H1/WDW260H1
Exclusion: WDW379H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE395H1    Independent Study (formerly WDW395H1 Employment Relations) [TBA]

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member.  Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Application form is due one week before the start of term. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses and a minimum cgpa of 2.5. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW395H1 Employment Relations
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE395Y1    Independent Study (formerly WDW395Y1 Employment Relations)[TBA]

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member.  Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Application form is due one week before the start of term. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses and a minimum cgpa of 2.5. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW395Y1 Employment Relations
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE396H1    Research Participation (formerly WDW396H1 Employment Relations)[TBA]

Credit course for supervised participation in a faculty research project. Offered only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 13 FCEs including IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses and a minimum cgpa of 3.0. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW396H1 Employment Relations
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE397Y1    Research Participation (formerly WDW397Y1 Employment Relations)[TBA]

Credit course for supervised participation in a faculty research project. Offered only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Consult the program website for additional information. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 13 FCEs including IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses and a minimum cgpa of 3.0. Approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
Exclusion: WDW397Y1 Employment Relations
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE430Y1    Employment Law (formerly WDW430Y1)[48L]

The major legal structures which regulate the employment relationship in the public and private sectors: the common law of contract (master/servant law), legislation governing collective bargaining, the primary statutes (Employment Standards Act, Labour Relations Act, Occupational Health and Safety Act, Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, and the Human Rights Code).

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1
Exclusion: WDW430Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE432Y0    Advanced Topics in Employment/Labour Relations (Abroad) (formerly WDW432Y0)[TBA]

Advanced topics in Employment Relations offered in an international setting. The content may vary from year to year.   Offered by the Professional & International Programs Office.

Prerequisite: 13 FCEs including IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW half credits in Employment Relations/permission from the Professional & International Programs Office.
Exclusion: WDW432Y0
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE444H1    Seminar in Employment Relations (formerly WDW444H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar examining contemporary issues in the employment relations and human resources field. Topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to discuss current issues and their economic, legal and social implications.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses
Exclusion: WDW444H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE446H1    Working as an Internal Organizational Consultant (formerly WDW446H1)[24S]

This course examines the various elements of the consulting process and the interpersonal skills required to build trust, influence others, contract with clients, and establish and maintain strong working relationships.   This seminar may include a compulsory learning format component using a service-learning placement with a community-based agency or organization.  Consult the current timetable for details.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses
Exclusion: WDW446H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE447H1    Contemporary Challenges Facing Today's Organizations (formerly WDW447H1)[24S]

An advanced seminar exploring significant developments in organizations, and the challenges and opportunities facing professionals in the employment relations field. Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving and critical thinking skills and examining theories and concepts of employment relations.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses
Exclusion: WDW447H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE472H1    Negotiations (formerly WDW372H1)[24S]

Resolving conflicts constructively is a challenge faced by all organizations and most individuals. This course will cover fundamentals of the negotiation process and conflict resolution. This course will apply multiple cases and simulations providing students with several opportunities to build their skills.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1
Exclusion: WDW372H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE494H1    Advanced Topics in Employment Relations (formerly WDW494H1)[24S]

Advanced topics vary from year to year, but the objective of the course is to explore theories, concepts and emerging issues in Employment Relations and their impact on internal and external environments.

Prerequisite: IRE244H1/WDW244H1, IRE260H1/WDW260H1, two 300-level IRE/WDW Employment Relations half-credit courses.
Exclusion: WDW494H1
Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Other Woodsworth Courses
WDW299Y1    Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirement Status: This is a Social Science course
Breadth Requirement: None