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A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

TBB 199H1F: Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (2): Fall Offerings

Section

Title College Time
L0041 The Age of Love: An Invitation to Medieval Culture Trinity Timetable
L0221 Music, Language, and the Human Experience   Timetable
L0281 The Language of Names   Timetable
L0282 Languages of Canada: Identity and Culture   Timetable
L0321 The Nature of Love   Timetable
L0381 Literature and Censorship   Timetable

TBB 199H1S: Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (2): Spring Offerings

Section Title College Time
L0101 Tragically Unhip: Great Thinkers of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries   Timetable
L0131 Innovative Teaching Methods in Chemistry   Timetable
L0261 Medieval Medicine Trinity Timetable
L0281 Language in Canadian Society   Timetable
L0282 Exploring Heritage Languages   Timetable
L0331 Cultural Literacy in the Information Age Woodsworth Timetable

 

TBB 199H1 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (Category 2): Fall Offerings

TBB 199H1F
Section L0041
Trinity College
Timetable

The Age of Love: An Invitation to Medieval Culture

How do human beings respond when it feels like their world is falling apart? The complex culture that we call "medieval" (c.500–c.1500) arose out of the ruins of the late Roman Empire. The medieval response to the passing away of all that seemed good and civilized can be traced through three paths, each emphasizing different virtues: the way of the warrior (strength and courage), the way of the monk (humility and renunciation), and the way of the philosopher (learning and reason). This course will examine representative writers from each of these strands, exploring how these three ways converged, despite the reality of violence and apparent futility, in a vision of love as the path of true human fulfilment. We will begin with two foundational texts written in the midst of the Roman collapse: the Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius (d. c.524), the principal source for medieval philosophy; and the roughly contemporary Rule of St. Benedict, the principal text for western monasticism. A study of the "way of the warrior" (and the related culture of feudalism) will focus on the career and literary afterlife of Charlemagne. We will then move to the twelfth century, when all three strands begin to converge on "love" as a supreme value: in war, the romances of Chretien de Troyes; in monasticism, the writings of St. Bernard of Clairvaux; and in philosophy, the career of Peter Abelard and his lover Heloise. This medieval "triumph of love" finds its synthesis in Dante's Vita Nuova, which strongly recalls the Consolation of Boethius, functioning as a "book-end" for the course. We will look at these writings alongside other contemporary artistic products, especially manuscript art (illustrated from University of Toronto collections) and music.
Instructor: J. Billett, Trinity College
Breadth categories: 2. Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1F
Section L0221
Timetable

Music, Language, and the Human Experience

Understanding what it means to be human is not only a fundamental part of scientific inquiry but also of our own coming to know ourselves. In this seminar, we will explore many aspects of the human experience by comparing and contrasting music and language. Guided by a series of core questions, we will reflect on the way(s) we think (To what extent are music and language structured similarly as systems? Do we process them with the same parts of our brains?), construct our personal and collective identities (What does the way we speak or the music we listen to reveal about who we are – our age, gender, socio-economic background? How do others – authority figures, advertisers, political institutions – use them to try to shape who we are?), and experience the world and universe (To what extent is our emotional and spiritual experience mediated by different types of language and music?).

Instructor: J. Steele. French
Breadth categories: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1F
Section L0281
Timetable

The Language of Names

We will examine personal names as a linguistic and cultural phenomenon. Topics to be discussed include the role of trends and fashions in naming (e.g., how certain sounds go in and out of style in names), and how this is connected to the diffusion of linguistic innovations; how names and nicknames are created; the association of sound with meaning in name formation; and the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of names. Students will be exposed to basic principles of linguistic analysis, and will gain experience carrying out real-life linguistic research by analyzing trends and patterns in historical and present-day baby name data.

Instructor: A. Dinkin, Linguistics
Breadth categories: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1F
Section L0282
Timetable

Languages of Canada: Identity and Culture

Canada is extraordinarily rich in languages: over 60 aboriginal languages, two official languages, and a multitude of heritage languages brought by more recent immigrants. Language rights have played an important role in this nation's history and speakers have strong feelings about the preservation of their own language. In this course we will explore the relationship between language, culture and identity with respect to the languages of Canada.

Instructor: E. Gold, Linguistics
Breadth category: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1F
Section L0321
Timetable

The Nature of Love

What is love? This course will explore the nature and varieties of love in the pages of world religious texts, philosophers, poets, and scientists. We will ask such questions as: What is the relationship between romantic love, friendship, and sexual desire? Is love a human universal or a cultural invention? Are there really such things as unconditional love or universal love for all humanity? Is love essentially giving or needy? Does love open our eyes to the real character of the beloved or blind us to it? Readings will include texts by Plato, Aristotle, Rumi, Kierkegaard, Freud, and Beauvoir, as well as selections from the Bible and contemporary psychologists.

Instructor: A.F. Hall, Philosophy
Breadth category: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1F
Section L0381
Timetable

Literature and Censorship

This class considers the dynamics between literature and the practices of cultural and social regulation. Through the study of controversial and banned texts, we will examine the themes of literature and the law; obscenity and the regulation of sexuality; political and ideological censorship; blasphemy and religion. We will also interrogate different ways of conceptualizing censorship itself.

Instructor: D. Obradovic, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth categories: 2. Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0101
Timetable

Tragically Unhip: Great Thinkers of the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

Charles Darwin, Sigmund Freud, Sir James Frazer, Sir Edward Burnet Tylor, Arnold van Gennep, Marcel Mauss and other great thinkers of the last century and a half produced ideas like evolution, the unconscious mind, magical thinking, animism, rites of passage, and reciprocity that pervade our view of ourselves and the exotic other. Yet these modern thinkers are often discounted, derided or presented in diluted and caricature form. This course takes a look at their ideas in their original and still most compelling form, examining the social contexts in which they were created and their relevance for the postmodern world we live in.

Instructor: G. Gillison, Anthropology
Breadth Requirement: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0131
Timetable

Innovative Teaching Methods in Chemistry

Good teaching is effective communication that engages the audience. Innovative methods, by definition, are engaging. To ensure that they also communicate effectively, we'll investigate the nature of science, how scientific knowledge is built, and what makes certain concepts in science problematic to the learner. We will then synthesize our understanding to develop communication tools for engaging our learners and communicating scientific ideas effectively. Students will read and discuss relevant articles in newsmagazines, popular science sources, and the educational literature. They will design and deliver mini lessons to communicate specified scientific concepts. As a major course project, students will eventually develop a communication tool that integrates pedagogical know-how with leading edge chemical discoveries to produce an accessible teaching unit that can be used by Ontario teachers.

Instructor: C. Kutas, Chemistry
Breadth categories: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0261
Trinity College & History
Timetable

Medieval Medicine

This course focuses on the theories and practices of medicine in Europe, c.500-1500, by examining surviving evidence from the period, including (in translation) pharmaceutical recipes, diagnostic guides, doctor's records, treatises on anatomy, surgery, and gynecology, commentaries on Hippocrates and Galen, laws and regulations for physicians, university lectures, disputes in court records, satirical writings against physicians, as well as visual evidence of artifacts, surgical instruments, manuscript illumination/diagrams, hospital sites and design. Proceeding chronologically, the course engages with such topics as: the heritage of ancient writings (Hippocrates, Galen), the impact of Christianity on medical thought, traditions of simple and compound drugs, physicians of barbarian kings, monastic medicine, Anglo-Saxon charms and recipes, clerical attitudes to medicine, the school of Salerno, the impact of Arabic authors on Europe, the rise of universities, scholastic methods and medical texts, crusader hospitals, advances in anatomy and surgery, the regulation of medical practitioners and pharmacists, and responses to the Black Death.

Instructor: N. Everett, History & Trinity College
Breadth categories: 2. Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0281
Timetable

Language in Canadian Society

We look at social change through two major themes: first, the linguistic and social consequences of Canadian multilingualism, and second, the impact on language (if any) of modern social forces such as immigration, mass media, literacy, mobility, urbanization, prolonged life expectancy including prolonged adolescence, and global communication.

Instructor: J. Chambers, Linguistics
Breadth category: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0282
Timetable

Exploring Heritage Languages

We will explore how speakers use Heritage Languages in Toronto. We will examine newly collected data from Cantonese, Korean, Russian, Italian, Ukrainian and Faetar speakers in the GTA. We will look for speech patterns that differentiate first, second and third generation speakers in Toronto from corresponding speakers in their countries of origin, and look at the effects of language attitudes and usage (who do you talk to? what do you use the language for?).

Instructor: N. Nagy, Linguistics
Breadth categories: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour

TBB 199H1S
Section L0331
Woodsworth College
Timetable

Cultural Literacy in the Information Age

Despite the increasing general cultural acceptance of online information gathering, the university remains divided on its value. On the one hand, students enter university with considerable Internet expertise, gained from prior formal training and from their personal experience of going online to answer everyday questions; moreover, many cultural changes, such as the move from print to online publications, seem to confirm online resources are vital for staying informed. On the other hand, skepticism is routinely voiced in the university about the academic merits of some of the online resources favored by students, including Google searches and consultation of Wikipedia. This seminar examines the roots of this ongoing disagreement in two related debates about education: first, how to integrate modern technology into the process of learning (computer literacy), and, second, how to decide what knowledge is required for full cultural participation (cultural literacy). These issues will be examined through course readings from a range of academic, general interest and discipline-specific sources. Using this material and independent research, students will judge what role the Internet should play in higher education.

Instructor: T. Moritz, Woodsworth College
Breadth category: 2 Thought, Belief, and Behaviour