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A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

SII 199Y1Y: Society and Its Institutions (3)

 

Section Title College Time
L0031 Ideas and Fine Thoughts Victoria Timetable
L0032 World War II France: Resistors, Bystanders, Collaborators and Nazis Victoria Timetable
L0181 Seminar in the History of Economic Thought   Timetable
L0182 Economics and Sustainable, Green Development   Timetable
L0352 MetroMarxism   Timetable
L0371 How Christianity Became the World's Largest Religion   Timetable
L0391 How We Use Time in Everyday Life   Timetable

SII 199Y1 Society and Its Institutions: Category 3

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0031       
Victoria College                             
Timetable

Ideas and Fine Thoughts

This course examines how political and social ideas are formed and developed through a selection of literature, art, plays, essays and philosophical works in the twentieth century. It focuses on the writings of Albert Camus, Jean Paul Sartre, Georges Bataille and Friedrich Durrenmatt. The course is also intended to begin the development of competencies in critical and creative thinking by reflective examination of ideas and judgments, communication skills in presenting written and oral arguments, information literacy by effective use of the library and other sources of information, and social and ethical responsibility by engaging in a critical reflection on your views and the views of others.

Instructor: D. Cook, Victoria College
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0032      
Victoria College                               
Timetable

World War II France: Resistors, Bystanders, Collaborators and Nazis

What comes to mind when thinking of resistors and collaborators in World War II France? Clichés of brave white men in berets, blowing up trains; images of smarmy collaborators. This seminar takes us beyond clichés, and into often overlooked realities: German policies in occupied territories; the role of women, foreigners, and people of colour in the French Resistance; the impact of Vichy policies on women’s rights.  The course calls into question just what it means to be a resistor or a collaborator, a good citizen vs. a bad one in time of crisis. The course uses a number of primary sources: films depicting the war years and historical documents.   In the process, students will be exposed to classics of cinema (Ophuls, Hitchcock, Chabrol, Malle, Berardinelli, Jewison), literature (Vercors), and history (Bloch). It also teaches a set of critical thinking and writing skills.

Instructor: E. Jennings, Victoria College
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0181                                                               
Timetable

Seminar in the History of Economic Thought

This seminar surveys the foundations of economics by reading the original texts of major economists. We focus on Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, and John Maynard Keynes because their books revolutionized economic thought by introducing Classical economics, Marxian economics, Microeconomics, and Macroeconomics respectively. We will see how their theories are solutions to universal economic problems within the context of the societies in which they lived.

Instructor: K. Furlong, Economics
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0182                                                               
Timetable

Economics and Sustainable, Green Development

Economic growth has been a powerful force through history in improving living standards throughout the world. At the same time, there is a growing recognition that environmental damage frequently accompanies this growth, whether it be at the local level (soil degradation and deforestation), or the global level (climate change). Economic analysis studies the analysis of scarce resources, but how can it incorporate "the environment" in a meaningful way that can help guide policy-makers in the 21st century? How can the trade-off between growth and the environment (if there is one) be assessed? What is "sustainable" or "green" development? This course explores the development of economic thinking and analysis as pertains to growth and its incorporation of the value of the environment, with a strong focus on the core ideas, especially as applied through "cost-benefit analysis." Throughout this seminar course, there will be a focus on case-studies of particular issues, drawing from both developed and developing countries.

Instructor: M. Anjomshoa, Economics                               
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0351                                                               
Timetable

MetroMarxism

This course analyses the writings of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels alongside secondary texts in a variety of disciplines in order to outline a critical approach to urban studies. In particular, the course follows two main inquiries: What processes shape contemporary urbanization? What possibilities exist for resistance against forms of inequality and exploitation that are cemented in urban spaces? These questions are posed in a variety of contexts, both in the global North and the global South. Potential topics include struggles over the commercialization of space, neoliberal reforms in accumulation and governance, voluntary and involuntary mobilities (i.e., tourism and migrations), gentrification, ecological crises, and militarization and surveillance. Comparative cases worldwide enable students to better understand the built environment and their place within it.

Instructor: T. Enright, Political Science
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0371                                                               
Timetable

How Christianity Became the World's Largest Religion

This seminar asks: How did a small movement of followers of Jesus of Nazareth in first century Palestine turn into the World's largest religion? Christians now number 2.3 billion people, one-third of the world’s population. They maintain communities in every country of the world, the only religion to do so. They form the majority of the population in two-thirds of the countries of the world. Christianity is the largest religion in Africa, Australia, Oceania, Europe, North America, South America, and even Antarctica. In Asia, they form the majority in the Philippines, as well as huge minorities in India, China, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Burma. To answer this intriguing question the seminar goes global and deals with a wide range of subjects over a 2000 year span.

Instructor: T. McIntire, Study of Religion
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199Y1Y            
Section L0391                                                               
Timetable

How We Use Time in Everyday Life

In substance, this seminar examines how people use time in their everyday lives: the content, the patterns, and the implications.  This analysis focuses on the circumstances under which variations in the use of time occur and the role of context – such as social factors or physical location – in governing people’s choices.  The data collected can serve as a model for understanding and explaining a number of issues in the social sciences.  The seminar will include both an examination of seminal writings about people’s use of time and hands-on practice in the strategies and techniques of analyzing data, including the formulation of questions and approaches to answering them.  Through this seminar, students will acquire – from a sociological perspective – an appreciation not only of the concept of time but also of how they use time in their daily lives and how time-use helps them better understand many situations.

Instructor: W. Michelson, Sociology
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions