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A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

SII 199H1F: Society and Its Institutions (3): Fall Offerings

Section Title College Time
L0031 How To Study Everyday Life Victoria Timetable
L0041 Health Policy in Canada: Past, Present and Future Trinity Timetable
L0181 Contemporary Economic Systems   cancelled
L0182 Contemporary Economic Systems   cancelled
L0201 Debating and Understanding Current Environmental Issues   Timetable
L0231 Cities and Everyday Life   Timetable
L0232 Cities and Everyday Life   Timetable
L0233 Environmental Change: Producing New Natures   Timetable
L0261 The First World War: Experience and Memory   Timetable
L0331 Pacifists, Peaceniks, and Popular Protests: Canadian Peace Movements in Transnational Context Woodsworth Timetable
L0351 China in the World   Timetable
L0352 Explaining Political Transitions   Timetable
L0391 The Sociology of Home   Timetable
L0401 How To Study Everyday Life Victoria Timetable

SII 199H1S: Society and Its Institutions (3): Spring Offerings

Section Title College Time
L0031 How To Study Everyday Life Victoria Timetable
L0101 The Process of Archaeological Discovery   Timetable
L0231 Political Spaces   Timetable
L0401 How To Study Everyday Life Victoria Timetable
L0141 Alexander the Great   Timetable

 

SII199H1 Society and Its Institutions (Category 3): Fall Offerings

SII 199H1F            
Section L0031      
Victoria College                             
Timetable

SII 199H1S            
Section L0031      
Victoria College                             
Timetable

How To Study Everyday Life

This seminar investigates the academic study of popular culture from a social science perspective, with an emphasis on North America. We look at ordinary events, customs, behaviours, attitudes, and fantasies and place them in a larger social context. What does small talk have to do with being Canadian? What does watching youtube videos do to maintain and reproduce, as well as to challenge, the kind of society where “money makes the world go round”? What messages are intended by the producers of a makeover TV show, and what messages are received by their consumers? What does beer advertising do to us? Other examples are taken from the news media, television, film, popular and classical musical forms, and aspects of daily life such as dieting and sports. Students are encouraged to critique each other’s presentations and assignments. Helping students to acquire university level research, essay writing, and discussion skills is an important goal of the course.

Instructor: I. Kalmar, Victoria College
Breadth category: 3 Society and its Institutions.

SII 199H1F      
Section L0041            
Trinity College                                          
Timetable

Health Policy in Canada: Past, Present, and Future

There is a need for strong public policy. One of Canada’s recognized areas of strength in this area has been in health. It actually is a fascinating part of our history from various studies and reports that were prepared at the federal level through the 1930s and 40s to the influence of the Beveridge Report (UK), to Saskatchewan’s bold move to implement the first hospital insurance plan in North America in 1947, a move that was repeated with the implementation of medical insurance in 1962, again a North American first. We will look at the strength of our policy-making at the provincial and federal levels, and at what we need to do to maintain the system in the present, and plan for the future. The issues are complex, and answers and processes complicated in our decentralized federal system. We will explore various options.

Instructor: L. Boehm, Trinity College
Breadth categories3. Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0201                                                              
Timetable

Debating and Understanding Current Environmental Issues

The course examines current environmental issues for which there is no easy answer or consensus position. For instance, to help solve climate change should we generate more electricity from nuclear power- plants, which have no greenhouse gas emissions? Or instead, should we phase out nuclear plants because of possible accidents, costs and radioactive wastes? The seminar examines the scientific and political aspects of such issues and debates the pros and cons of each.

Instructor: K. Ing, School of the Environment
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0231                                                               
Timetable

Cities and Everyday Life

Over fifty percent of the world’s inhabitants now live in cities. In Canada, eighty percent of Canadians live in cities with populations of 500,000 or more, and the proportion of urban dwellers continues to grow. Understanding the nature of everyday living within cities is therefore increasingly important. This course examines the links between social, political and economic transformation and the continual building and rebuilding of urban landscapes at a variety of scales. A key focus will be on urban lives and livelihoods, and on the way lives differ by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Both theories and methods that help us understand urban life will be explored. The course will include one or more of the following sub-topics: (1) urban health and marginalization, (2) housing and homelessness, (3) urban governance and institutions, (4) social justice movements in the city, (5) processes of economic and geographic restructuring and their impacts on work, employment and well-being, (6) urban cultures, identities and diversity, (7) crime, violence and security, (8) mobility, access and transportation, (9) built environments, public space, and civil society.

Instructor: R. Difrancesco, Geography
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0232                                                               
Timetable

Cities and Everyday Life

Over fifty percent of the world’s inhabitants now live in cities. In Canada, eighty percent of Canadians live in cities with populations of 500,000 or more, and the proportion of urban dwellers continues to grow. Understanding the nature of everyday living within cities is therefore increasingly important. This course examines the links between social, political and economic transformation and the continual building and rebuilding of urban landscapes at a variety of scales. A key focus will be on urban lives and livelihoods, and on the way lives differ by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Both theories and methods that help us understand urban life will be explored. The course will include one or more of the following sub-topics: (1) urban health and marginalization, (2) housing and homelessness, (3) urban governance and institutions, (4) social justice movements in the city, (5) processes of economic and geographic restructuring and their impacts on work, employment and well-being, (6) urban cultures, identities and diversity, (7) crime, violence and security, (8) mobility, access and transportation, (9) built environments, public space, and civil society.

Instructor: J. Hackworth , Geography
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F
Section L0233                                                               
Timetable

Environmental Change: Producing New Natures

Why do we have environmental problems? How do we understand these problems, their origins, and what should be done about them? This course aims to provide background and insight on the dizzying array of contemporary environmental problems by examining their complex origins and implications in some detail. Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-driven, interdisciplinary intellectual tools required to understand phenomena that are produced through novel combinations of biophysical processes and human actions. Consistent themes will include: the human processes that tend to propel these transformations; geographies of integrated social and ecological transformation; challenges to existing institutions and social relations; and strategies in environmental governance. Case studies will draw on a wide range of issues, including the emergence of genetically modified organisms; long-term nuclear wastes; persistent synthetic organic compounds; an altered global climate; complex socio-ecological aspects of waste production and management; industrial agriculture; and large scale landscape transformations more generally.
Instructor: D. McGregor, Geography
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0261                                                                  
Timetable

The First World War: Experience and Memory

One hundred years after the outbreak of the Great War, this course explores the experiences of both men and women – soldiers and those on the home front – in various countries, using newly available primary documents and even sound recordings from 1914-1918. The course also examines the ways in which the war has been and is being memorialized, especially with the commemorative activities ongoing in 2014. In keeping with new research on the Great War, the course will address European, North American, and global perspectives on the conflict.

Instructor: J. Jenkins, History
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0331      
Woodsworth College                     
Timetable

Pacifists, Peaceniks and Popular Protests:  Canadian Peace Movements in Transnational Context

"Millions of people take to the streets of major cities around the globe to protest the Iraq war."  "More than 35 cities and towns across Canada hold rallies to stop the war in Afghanistan."  “The Arab Spring calls for democratic change.” “Iran’s nuclear ambitions raise warnings of war.”  These and other headlines confirm that public pressure for world peace and peaceful political change continues to be an important social movement, but the recent protests are only the latest stage in the evolution of an organized rejection of violence and war. This course examines major peace movements since the early twentieth century with a special focus on the Canadian experience.  After a review of the religious and philosophical basis of pacifism as well as the historical development of secular peace movements, students will study a number of peace movements, past and present, in terms of such issues as religious and ideological commitment, gender composition and popular culture. The course, taught in an interactive seminar format, will assist students in developing skills in academic research and writing, presentations and class discussions.  Where appropriate, films will be integrated with a variety of interdisciplinary readings.  Evaluation will be based on class discussion, reading, a term test, a research essay proposal and a research essay.

Instructor: T. Socknat, Woodsworth College
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0351                                                               
Timetable

China in the World

This course examines the fundamental building blocks of China’s foreign policies, from domestic sources of foreign policies to changing strategic priorities. It explores the implications of China’s rise for the Asia-Pacific region and the international political system in general. The course attempts to present a balanced viewpoint, taking into account analyses presented by Sinologists and non-Sinologists.

Instructor: L. Ong, Political Science
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0352                                                               
Timetable

Explaining Political Transitions

This course explores the dynamics of regime change from a comparative and historical perspective. In particular, it focuses on the factors that facilitate and inhibit radical political change. Varying modes of change are analyzed including social revolution, radical reform, fundamentalist reactions, and restructuring from above. Examples will be drawn largely from the experience of authoritarian and post-authoritarian transitions in the Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and the Asia Pacific. The post-1970s global wave of democratizing initiatives will be discussed at length as well as the post-Communist rebuilding of political institutions in Eastern Europe and Asia.

Instructor: V. Falkenheim, Political Science
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0391                                                               
Timetable

The Sociology of Home

Is home a place, or an idea? Is it a collection of rooms, habits, or wishes? Is home private refuge or a place of display and performance? Is home orderly or chaotic, a place to breathe or a place of fear and loathing? Through studying how people make and think about home, sociologists have broadened our understanding of intimacy, aging and the life course, leisure, consumption, and commensality, economic inequality, the social organization of race, class and gender, urban and regional planning, the balance of work and life, migration and dislocation, self and society. In this course, we will read wide-ranging and thoughtful research that deepens our understanding of this taken-for-granted but intensely important concept.

Instructor: J. Taylor, Sociology
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1F            
Section L0401      
Victoria College                             
Timetable

SII 199H1S            
Section L0401      
Victoria College                             
Timetable

How To Study Everyday Life

This seminar investigates the academic study of popular culture from a social science perspective, with an emphasis on North America. We look at ordinary events, customs, behaviours, attitudes, and fantasies and place them in a larger social context. What does small talk have to do with being Canadian? What does watching youtube videos do to maintain and reproduce, as well as to challenge, the kind of society where “money makes the world go round”? What messages are intended by the producers of a makeover TV show, and what messages are received by their consumers? What does beer advertising do to us? Other examples are taken from the news media, television, film, popular and classical musical forms, and aspects of daily life such as dieting and sports. Students are encouraged to critique each other’s presentations and assignments. Helping students to acquire university level research, essay writing, and discussion skills is an important goal of the course.

Instructor: I. Kalmar, Spanish & Portuguese, Victoria College
Breadth category: 3 Society and its Institutions.

SII199H1S Society and Its Institutions (Category 3): Winter Offerings

SII 199H1S            
Section L0101                                                              
Thursdays 10-12

The Process of Archaeological Discovery
Archaeological discoveries have profoundly changed our view of humanity and history. This course will examine how archaeologists discover the past and what happens when these discoveries are communicated to the public. The class will focus on a series of case studies. Students will first work through the scientific literature to understand the nature of the discovery and the methods used by the archaeologists to identify the importance of the discovery. With this background we will consider what happens to this information when it is spread to the public through the media. We will also examine how conflict can emerge over who should control the archaeological remains. The case studies will come from a wide range of geographic contexts and will include both prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Instructor: M. Chazan, Anthropology
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1S            
Section L0231                                                               
Timetable

Political Spaces

Is space political? In what ways? What are the implications of thinking about politics geographically? How do political conflicts both invoke and transform space and place? What kinds of alternative political relationships to space and alternative mappings can we imagine? This course will attempt to answer those questions while exploring a wide range of possible contexts in which political spaces are evident. These may include: conflicts over the intimate spaces of the body, identity, and the home; the racialization and gendering of space; the politics of cities and urbanization; the boundaries of public and private space; struggles over land, property, resources and ‘nature’; the political geographies of labour, citizenship and migration; globalization of economic markets and alternative economic political and social cartographies; borders, geopolitics, and the territorial politics of empire; and the geographic projects of colonialism, post-coloniality, modernity, and modernization.

Instructor: M. Farish, Geography
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions

SII 199H1S           
Section L0141                                                               
Mondays 1-3

Alexander the Great

This course explores the meteoric career of Alexander the Great, tracing his childhood in Macedon, his accession to the throne after the murder of his father, his great campaigns across Asia as far as India, and finally his death at the age of only 32. Along the way we will pay attention to broader historical questions. To what degree, if at all, can the “historical” Alexander be recovered? How and why do ancient narratives about Alexander differ from our own? What kind of broader cultural interactions did his campaigns engender, and what were the lasting effects? Finally how should we evaluate a figure whose career is often construed as the glorious product of personal virtue and high-minded ideals, but can as easily be interpreted as the sordid consequence of megalomania, less a tale of military glory than of murder, ruthless propaganda and even genocide?

Instructor:  E. Lytle, Classics 
Breadth category: 3 Society and Its Institutions