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A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

LTE 199H1F: Living Thing and Their Environment (4): Fall Offerings

Section Number Title College Time
L0121 Wild Toronto   Timetable
L0421 Biotechnology and Society   Timetable
L5421 Biotechnology and Society   Timetable

LTE 199H1S: Living Thing and Their Environment (4): Spring Offerings

Section Number Title College Time
L0101 People, Food and Health: Applied Anthropological Perspectives   Timetable
L0121 Human Development   cancelled
L0122 Animal Behaviour and Biodiversity Up Close   Timetable
L0421 Human and Biological Viruses   Timetable
L0422 Genes, Genomes and Us   Timetable

LTE 199H1F: Living Thing and Their Environment (4): Fall Offerings

LTE 199H1F           
Section L0121                                                              
Timetable

Wild Toronto

Most of us are urban creatures. We can find our way to our favourite restaurant, art gallery, or shopping mall with ease. We are comfortable navigating our environment. But how many of us ever take our eyes off digital devices to discover the animals that share the city with us? In this course we will identify the other vertebrate species comprising the ecological community that we call “Toronto”. We will learn their names, whether they are endemic (from here originally) or newcomers, general aspects of their biology that suit them to living in an urban environment, and what happens when the wild and the domesticated members of the community meet one another. We will then expand our perspective to investigate Toronto’s global ecological footprint by collecting information about the species we “use” in our daily lives – for food, for health, to clothe and adorn ourselves, and as pets.

Instructor: D. McLennan, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment

LTE 199H1F           
Section L0421                                                              
Timetable

LTE 199H1F           
Section L5421                                                              
Timetable

Biotechnology and Society

From the manipulation of genes of plants for improved food production through to human tissue engineering and stem cell research, biotechnology is increasingly playing a major role in our world.  Society, however, is often challenged by the rapid advances in our knowledge in these areas, and how to best apply these technologies in a manner that is socially responsible and economically viable.  In this seminar course, students will research and describe various applications of biotechnology using information obtained from reputable sources, and lead discussions on the benefits and concerns that arise from this research.

Instructor: J. Coleman, Cell and Systems Biology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment

LTE 199H1S: Living Thing and Their Environment (4): Winter Offerings

LTE 199H1S          
Section L0101                                                              
Timetable

People, Food and Health: Applied Anthropological Perspectives

This course explores the social, ecological and biocultural processes that modulate the relationships between human beings, the environments from which we derive our food, and our ever changing health profile. Using diverse perspectives from evolutionary, nutritional and applied anthropology, students will read, present, discuss, evaluate and understand evidence that provides insights into how relationships between people, food and health have changed since the earliest origins of our species and into the present. Topics will include the co-evolution of human diet and vulnerability in relation to ecology; the unique physical and social characteristics of humans and their food sources; ancient, colonial, industrial and post-modern, globalized food systems; the human biology of nutrition and health across the life cycle; culture, cuisine and the social life of food; controversies about current global food, environment and health challenges; and the exciting potential of new, evidence-based and applied approaches to addressing and mitigating these challenges.

Instructor: D. Sellan, Anthropology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment

LTE 199H1S      
Section L0122                                                              
Timetable

Animal Behaviour and Biodiversity Up Close

This course will introduce concepts in animal behaviour and biodiversity through nature documentaries, zoo webcams, and by watching footage from animals fitted with cameras. You will design your own prospectus for a nature documentary, learn to analyze behaviour from webcams, and write a grant proposal to fund an animal-cam project. Throughout the course, we will inventory the diversity of animals given scientific coverage via film and popular animal websites and compare this to the present distribution of the world’s major animal groups.  We will also discuss how to evaluate the integrity of scientific information presented in film and Internet sources by cross referencing with the scientific literature.

Instructor: B. Raboy, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment

LTE 199H1S          
Section L0421                                                               
Timetable

Human and Biological Viruses

This course allows the students to broaden their knowledge about the most important human viruses and prions.  In essence, what viruses are, what they do, what are the diseases caused by viruses and how they are transmitted etc. and what can be done about them (vaccines, antiviral treatments etc.).  Viruses cause many diseases ranging from a benign rash to severe hemorrhages and death. Each student will select a specific topic in Virology and write an essay and present a seminar for the rest of the class. Major “hot” problems in Virology from pandemics to controversial vaccines will also be discussed.  Two tests covering all materials presented by all the student’s seminars will be conducted. Final mark in course includes the tests and the essay.

Instructor: M. AbouHaidar, Cell and Systems Biology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment

LTE 199H1S          
Section L0422                                                               
Timetable

Genes, Genomes and Us

With the completion of the human genome sequence, we now have access to more information than ever before about our genetic make-up.  The human genome contains 3 billion base pairs of DNA, encoding an estimated 25,000 genes, which are the basic units of heredity.  This course addresses topics such as what are genes, how are they identified and how does knowledge about genes impact society at large.  One focus is how this information is used to understand and treat human diseases.   Starting from media reports in which given genes have been identified that cause certain diseases, students examine the original scientific research that underlies these claims.  In so doing, students explore the basic concepts that explain the genetic foundations of complex traits.  Building on this, the significance of genomic research for understanding human biology, and the social consequences that may result from it, are discussed.  Evaluation is based on class discussions, oral presentations and written essays.

Instructors:  A. Bruce, Cell and Systems Biology
Breadth category: 4 Living Things and Their Environment