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A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

2015-2016 CCR 199H1F: Cultural and Creative Representations (Category 1): Fall Offerings

Section Number Title College Time
L0021 Introduction to Digital Humanities University Timetable
L0022 Remembering Childhood in the Middle East University Timetable
L0101 The Anthropology of Brands   Timetable
L0141 Homer's Iliad Down through Time   Timetable
L0142 The City of Rome   Timetable
L0143 The Cultural Politics of Pleasures   Timetable
L0191 Pulp Fiction   Timetable
L0192 The Coming –Out Novel   Timetable
L0211 Public Art in Toronto   Timetable
L0221 Pleasure, Pain and Nostalgia in Belle Epoque   Timetable
L0301 Iranian Women Write Their Lives: The First Generation   Timetable
L0381 The Cossacks   Timetable
L0382 Literature and Painting in Russia and the West   Timetable

2015-2016 CCR 199H1S: Cultural and Creative Representations (Category 1): Spring Offerings

Section Number Title College Time
L0021 The "New" Visual Culture University Timetable
L0091 Hoboes, Geniuses, and Immigrants: Otherness in Contemporary Culture Innis Timetable
L0171 Writing Matters: Tools for Text Production in and around Japanese Literature   Timetable
L0172 The Voice, Politics, and World History   Timetable
L0211 The World of Heroes   Timetable
L0251 The Grail: Medieval and Modern Imaginations   Timetable
L0252 Technology and the Human   Timetable
L0301 Iranian Women Write Their Lives: The Young Generation   Timetable
L0302 Transmissions of the Knowledge in the Ancient World   Timetable
L0321 Multiculturalism, Philosophy, and Film   Timetable
L0331 Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours Woodsworth Timetable
L0381 The Slavic Grecian Formula: From Ancient Rhapsode to Modern Rap Song   Timetable

CCR 199H1F: Cultural and Creative Representations (Category 1): Fall Offerings

CCR 199H1F
Section L0021
University College
Timetable

Introduction to Digital Humanities

This course will introduce students to quantitative research tools and Digital Humanities research methodologies that can usefully inform Canadian Studies. By exploring innovative Canadian digital academic archives, Digital Humanities community hubs, and online resources, students will reflect critically on the impact, advantages and limitations of the shift to digital texts and tools and how digital tools, techniques, and media forms are altering how knowledge is produced and disseminated in the humanities and social sciences. We will work with online text analytics tools in order to understand how quantitative methods can support critical academic research in a range of disciplines, including but not limited to literary, historical, and cultural studies. Guest speakers will discuss their projects and design strategies. Students will create individual and group works, both of which may contribute to an online course website open to the public.

Siobhan O'Flynn, University College
Instructor: S. O'Flynn, University College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0022
University College
Timetable

Remembering Childhood in the Middle East

Some of the biographical sketches are written by Western-trained academics of various backgrounds; others are autobiographical reminiscences. The collections seek to portray a wide range of people's experiences over the past century. I would select themes ("colonialism"; "work"; "family"; "revolution"; "community"; "war") and (auto-) biographical readings that deal with these themes. I would give students enough historical background so that they are able to contextualize the readings, but the readings themselves will bring the past alive to the students in a personal way. I would draw the biographies from two published sources. One is Edmund Burke III, ed., "Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East": http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520246614. The other is Elizabeth Fernea, ed., "Remembering Childhood in the Middle East":
http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/ferrem.

Instructor: J. Reilly, University College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0101
Timetable

The Anthropology of Brands

This course will look at the phenomenon of brands from the perspective of their meaning, symbolism, and overall connection to culture. Specifically it will examine the origins of brands and logos as a strategy for imparting a personality to products and a particular type of symbolism. It will also look at the system of advertising, placement, and campaigning that brands use to spread their particular type of meanings and lifestyle ideas to society at large. The overall goal of the seminar is to determine the cultural implications of brands and brand advertising.

Instructor: M. Danesi, Anthropology
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0141
Timetable

Homer's Iliad down through Time

This course will survey creative works inspired by Homer's Iliad, both ancient and modern. We will first examine different contexts of the Homeric poem, including the possible historicity of the Trojan War and the non-Homeric myths of the "Epic Cycle." Then we will read through the Iliad in conjunction with various "receptions" of it, ancient and modern. Ancient works include the Rhesus of Euripides, the Aeneid of Virgil, and an unbelievable account by "Dictys of Phrygia," which purports to be a first-hand account of the real war. Dictys influenced a vast amount of Medieval literature about Troy, including the story of Troilus and Cressida, for which we will read Shakespeare's version. Modern works based on the Iliad will include lyric poems, prose novels, and Troy the movie. Translations of the great epic will also be sampled. All this material, various in date, media, and fidelity to their Homeric source, will provide us with a well-rounded sense of how the Iliad has been re-imagined over the ages.

Instructor: J. Burgess, Classics
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0142
Timetable

The City of Rome

This course examines the transformation of Rome from a river town in Central Italy to the largest city in the pre-modern western world and the political and economic capital of a Mediterranean-wide empire. We will chart this development by analyzing the material culture of the ancient city. Additionally, we will study a variety of written sources that allow a privileged view into the society that produced this material culture. We will seek to understand how the city's physical setting changed, and we will ask basic questions about daily life, wealth distribution, disease, pollution, and population density in an ancient million-person metropolis. The course will conclude by considering the changes of late antiquity, the so-called "Fall of Rome," and the legacy of ancient Rome up to the present day.

Instructor: S. Bernard, Classics
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0143
Timetable

The Cultural Politics of Pleasures

Discussions of pleasures are seldom disinterested measurements of quantities of neurological stimulation. Instead pleasures are regularly evaluated according to various culturally charged criteria: good pleasures, bad pleasures, and so forth. We are going to examine the ways in which pleasures are discussed. And in particular we will explore the insistence in some quarters on the moral and political significance of various kinds of pleasure. Our principle material will come from the various ways of evaluating pleasures that can be found in the writings of ancient Greece and Rome. A great deal of discussion surrounded the concrete pleasures of eating, drinking and sex as well as even more abstract pleasures like the enjoyment of spectacles and literature. What pleasures matter? How? Why? To whom?
We will also use the ancient material to think critically about our own contemporary discussions of pleasure.

Instructor: E. Gunderson, Classics
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0191
Timetable

Pulp Fictions

This seminar will explore the ways in which serious, thoughtful—or intellectually challenging—literature employs sexuality and violence, not to titillate the reader, but to force us to engage moral complexity. Our major critical guide will be John Fraser's Violence in the Arts (1974). We will read plays, poetry, graphic texts, and fiction that emphasize vivid 'shocks' as a way of asking us to confront the curt affronts that flout humanizing notions of "courtesy." We must read Titus Andronicus (Shakespeare), Rape: A Love Story (Oates), Collected Works of Billy the Kid (Ondaatje), How to Make Love to a Negro (Laferrière ), Story of O (Réage), Afrodisiac (Maruca & Rugg), Blood Relations (Pollock), Toronto Noir (Armin & Moore, eds.), and Poems (Plath). We will watch such films as Django Unchained (Tarantino), Titus (Taymor), A History of Violence (Cronenberg), and Fat Girl (Breillat). Evaluation will rest upon participation (approx. 20%) and two 7-page (double-spaced) papers.

Instructor: G. E. Clarke, English
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0192
Timetable

The Coming-Out Novel

The narrative of sexual self-discovery and self-revelation has long been a staple of lesbian/gay/queer literature. Yet momentous changes in the visibility and enfranchisment of sexual minorities over the last decades mean that the cultural context of such narratives has shifted dramatically. In this course, we'll read a selection of novels and plays from the 1950's through the early years of the new century. Our discussion will also include film versions of several of these works. We'll map a history of cultural and political struggles that inform the texts. We'll discuss historic changes in the rhetoric by which members of sexual minorities make sense of their experience.

Instructor: D. Townsend, English
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0211
Timetable

Public Art in Toronto

We are surrounded by public art that covers the spectrum from official commemorative monuments to illegal street art. We will examine the history and current practice of this form internationally and in Toronto. The focus will be on discussing the nature and issues pertaining to original works in situ.

Instructor: M. Cheetham, Department of Art
Breadth categories: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0221
Timetable

Pleasure, Pain and Nostalgia in Belle Époque

The delightfully simple "joie de vivre" of Parisian music-halls and cabarets fascinated the Western world and art took new forms with Impressionism and Art Nouveau during "La belle époque", a period in European history that began during the late 19th century and lasted until World War I. This course will explore ideas and cultural representations through examples of French art, philosophy, and literature with an emphasis on the critical discussion of two literary narratives that challenged tradition and authority: Gustave Flaubert, "Madame Bovary"; Guy de Maupassant, "Bel-ami". The literary themes of "guilt" and "self-quest" as well as the inherent philosophical tension between "pleasure" and "guilt" will be analyzed in the context of the bohemian culture of "La belle époque". Multimedia presentations and selections from Fernando Trueba's 1992 film "Belle époque" will supplement the reading material in the course.
Required texts: Flaubert -"Madame Bovary", Maupassant - "Bel-ami", Film: "Belle époque" (Fernando Trueba, 1992).
A selection of course notes and multimedia presentations will be available via Blackboard.
In-class test (35%); Take-home essay (30%); Final in-class essay (25%); Overall assessment (10%).

Instructor: M. A. Visoi, French
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0301
Timetable

Iranian Women Write Their Lives: The First Generation

The story of women writing about their lives begins in Iran in the early decades of the 20th century. This course examines the lives of women from various backgrounds, born in different decades of a century of significant social and cultural change. We will refer primarily to memoirs written by the women themselves which are records of women's hardship and accomplishment, in a changing culture. One memoirist writes of social programs she initiated in a Persian village in the 1950s, another reveals family relationships, another is a social activist for human rights after the 1979 revolution, another, a recording artist. Seminar discussion is based on assigned readings from the memoirs. Class participation, written assignments, and an oral presentation provide opportunities for students to develop speaking and writing skills as well as engage with the course materials.

Instructor: R. Sandler, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0381
Timetable

The Cossacks

The Cossacks were any number of things in fact--indeed, the term can be applied to different groups of people--but they were even more in fiction. This course surveys the representation of Cossacks in literary works ranging across a wide variety of cultures and eras. Were the Cossacks Russian, Polish, Ukrainian or all of the above? Were they the agents of a repressive Russian government, the hirelings of Polish kings, the tormentors of East European Jews, the protectors of Europe from the Ottomans, or the liberators of the Ukrainian nation? Were they East European cowboys, legendary warriors, defenders of Orthodox Christianity, or a motley collection of drunken mercenaries? We will survey depictions of Cossacks in works of folklore, and in literary works by Russian, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian writers.

Instructor: Maxim Tarnawsky, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1F
Section L0382
Timetable

Literature and Painting in Russia and the West

In his Six Memos for the Millennium, Italo Calvino, one of the 20th century's foremost writers, writes about the 'visibility' of literature as one of its most important virtues. What makes literature 'visible'? How do the verbal and the visual coexist? This seminar explores the relationship between words and images, texts and pictures through history, in Russia and the West. Special attention will be paid to the figure of the artist. Is it a writer's alter ego, the incarnation of creativity, or just a character among others? Literary texts (mainly short stories) from Balzac and Gogol to Chekhov and O. Henry, Maugham and Bunin, Nabokov and Camus will be studied along with the paintings of some major 19th-20th century artists. The comparative dimension of the course will help students contextualize Russian literature and think about its relationship with the Western canon. We will also watch some 21st century films about artists (such as Julie Taymor's Frida [2002], Milos Forman Goya's Ghosts [2006], and, most recent, Mike Leigh Mr. Turner [2014]). All texts will be in English.

Instructor: T. Smoliarova, Slavic Languages and Literature
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0021
University College
Timetable

The "New" Visual Culture

Comics, graphic novels, and other forms of visual culture (such as video and anime) are now considered objects for serious study. In this course, we will examine the various genres of visual art which combine the visual and the textual. We will examine the rhetorical uses of visual culture in order to think through important questions within various subgenres: short narratives, auto/biography, the superhero, multimedia, and film (wherever possible). In particular, we will explore the following questions: To what rhetorical purposes are the things that comprise visual culture used? What is the relationship in these texts between the writer and his or her social context, and how is that represented by the visual codes of these texts? In pursuing these questions, we will delve into the history of visual culture, look at how both history and current events are represented in the comics medium, and consider the intertextual interplay of literature and various visual arts.
Instructor: A. Lesk, University College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0091
Innis College
Timetable

Hoboes, Geniuses, and Immigrants: Otherness in Contemporary Culture

Hoboes, geniuses, and immigrants all share a sense of Otherness in terms of their identity because they are different from the norm. This course analyzes the factors that create the sense of Otherness in an individual. Can Otherness be chosen as an identity or is it imposed by society? What conditions make Otherness a positive or negative experience? Instances of Otherness are analyzed in contemporary novels and films. The course focuses on the immigrant experience and on the issue of sexual identity.

Instructor: J. Paterson, Innis College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0171
Timetable

Writing Matters: Tools for Text Production in and around Japanese Literature

This course examines influences of technology, materiality and corporeality of writing on the ways in which authors wrote in the history of Japanese literature from tenth to twenty-first centuries, with occasional references to historical moments in other literary traditions. Elements for consideration include writing surfaces (sheets, scrolls, cards, notebooks, grids, screen), writing utensils (brush, pen, keyboard, mouse, cell phone, touch screen); ink, typewriter ribbon, cartridge, and digital coding of letters; furniture and interior design (desk, chair, lighting), and participation of others in the process of writing (dictation, proofreading, copyediting). Questions will be raised on how the movement of fingers and eyeballs affected texts that we might conventionally consider products of the minds, how the transition from one technological stage to another—prior to, through and beyond the age of print culture—can be traced in texts, and how consciously authors negotiated with those coordinates.

Instructor: A. Sakaki, East Asian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0172
Timetable

The Voice, Politics, and World History

How are we to understand the concept and power of the voice as central to politics and even to "world history"? What relationship does the voice have to linguistics, physics, metaphysics, ethics, politics--and "world history"? Can we also imagine something like an "economy of the voice"? Inspired by Mladen Dolar's 2006 book, A Voice and Nothing More, this class takes his analysis of the voice to task by experimenting with different aspects of his basic claim, namely, that the voice is a concept and category that warrants its own, peculiar investigation, for it has too long languished in the shadows of the word and sign.

Instructor: K. Kawashima, East Asian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0211
Timetable

The World of Heroes

The course examines both the literature and the visual evidence surrounding ancient Greek heroes (and heroines) and their mythological narratives, through which we explore ancient culture, art and religion. The course material is drawn from a variety of primary sources including the Iliad and the Odyssey, Greek tragedies, as well as Greek vase painting, sculpture and architecture. It also touches upon critical and theoretical issues regarding the notion of the hero. In doing so, students will learn how the liminal status of heroes, bridging humans and the divine, plays a crucial role in self-identity, culture and politics of the ancient Greece world. This leads into exploring how the long tradition of heroes continue to play a role in our contemporary western society—both on popular cultural, as well as socio-political levels—which will be achieved through critical examinations of visual media and films.

Instructor: S.J. Kim, Department of Art
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0251
Timetable

The Grail: Medieval and Modern Imaginations

The course investigates one of the most potent cultural symbols: the Grail. The course traces the history of this object back to its origins in the European imagination of the High Middle Ages. Topics of the course include the Grail's prominent roots in medieval European culture and the significance of Christianity and medieval chivalric culture for these roots; Grail narratives in high medieval European literature; imaginations of a 'Grail castle' and a 'Grail realm;' and how medieval audiences linked the Grail to fabulous notions of 'India' and 'Asia.' In a second step, the course moves on to modern renderings of the Grail and new Grail narratives, especially in opera and film.

Instructor: M. Stock, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0252
Timetable

Technology and the Human

Technology has changed our lives: from railway to car and plane, from telegraph to phone and e-mail, and from wooden artificial limbs to organic prosthetics, scientific knowledge has enhanced human capacities. At the same time, though, this development is also experienced as a threat: killing missiles, controlling 'Big Brothers,' and frightening monstrous creatures are the flip-side of technological advancement. This course examines the following questions: What is the relationship between technology and the "human"? Can there be progress of technology without a regress of humanity? Or is technology liberating us from the bonds of nature? We will discuss possible answers by looking at some of the most relevant materials in literature, philosophy, and cultural history (including film) from the eighteenth century to Post-Modernity. However, we do not want to deal with this pressing topic only theoretically. Since technology does not remain in the ivory tower of academia but concerns our every-day life, we will strive to find our own stance towards technology by observing our daily experiences. Therefore, some of the assignments will prompt you to explore your own technological environment.

Instructor: C. Lehleiter, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0301
Timetable

Iranian Women Write Their Lives: The Young Generation

The focus of this course is a generation of Iranian women who were born in Iran but who moved with their families to North America as a consequence of the 1979 Revolution. The course relies on memoirs written by this generation, in the English language to describe the trauma of dislocation for parents and children alike. Many of these young women try to satisfy a longing for the world of their childhood by returning to Iran. The young women use the medium of the memoir to explore feelings of who they are and where they belong. Seminar discussions are based on assigned readings from the memoirs. Written assignments, an oral presentation and seminar discussion provide opportunities to practice writing and speaking skills and to engage with the course materials.

Instructor: R. Sandler, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth Category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0302
Timetable

Transmissions of Knowledge in the Ancient World

This course investigates how scribal and intellectual knowledge may have been transmitted in the ancient Near East. Looking at archival and library records it examines the role of the scribes in palace and temple economies and tries to determine to what extent their multilingualism contributed to a transmission of knowledge. As a diachronic study the course identifies overarching information, or metadata, which demonstrate the transfer of knowledge in a process of adoption and adaptation of scribal practices across social, linguistic, and political boundaries in a historical continuum. It demonstrates the need of any given political entity for an ethnic identity, expressed in the need for one's own language and script, via the initial adoption of a foreign language and/or script. The vehicle to find that political and cultural voice are professionally trained scribes, attested throughout ancient civilizations from fourth millennium B.C. Uruk to seventh century AD Bactra.

Instructor: M. Brosius, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0321
Timetable

Multiculturalism, Philosophy, and Film

This seminar will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social "other." Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism, and (5) the ways in which cinema can help illuminate a cluster of relevant notions in political philosophy including citizenship, communitarianism, cosmopolitanism, and the relation between individual rights and group rights. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings.

Instructor: F. Gagliardi, Philosophy
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0331
Woodsworth College
Timetable

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen's 1813 novel about spirited Elizabeth Bennet and forbidding Mr. Darcy, has been admired by critics and readers since its publication. The novel rewards study both for its own sake—a model of English prose fiction and a revealing image of England on the threshold of modernity—and for what its contemporary popularity reveals about our time, which has witnessed an outpouring of retellings and adaptations of the novel since a highly successful 1995 BBC television production starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth. The principal question explored in the seminar is the extent to which Austen's original story survives in contemporary versions. Works studied will include Austen's Pride and Prejudice, screen adaptations of the novel, and text and screen works based on Pride and Prejudice, including Bridget Jones's Diary.

Instructor: T. Moritz, Woodsworth College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

CCR 199H1S
Section L0381
Timetable

The Slavic Grecian Formula: From Ancient Rhapsode to Modern Rap Song

Slavic singers of oral epics about war, lust, honour and revenge have made a special contribution to our appreciation of classical literature and mythology. We will read heroic tales from Russia, Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia. Recent research shows that they share much, in melody and message, with the songs of today's hip-hop artists, whose roots of rap "flowing" reach back to the beginnings of Western literature and the rhapsodes of ancient Greece. This connection is based on performance theory about modern-day Slavic "Homers." As we read Homer's Iliad closely, we will study Slavic epics and listen to African-American rap songs to learn how and why they were composed. Students will experience a multimedia, hyperlinked eEdition of an oral performance by a traditional Slavic epic singer. No knowledge of languages other than English is required.

Instructor: R. Bogert, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations